The Modern Part of an Universal History: From the Earliest Account of Time. Compiled from Original Writers. By the Authors of The Antient Part

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S. Richardson, T. Osborne, C. Hitch, A. Millar, John Rivington, S. Crowder, P. Davey and B. Law, T. Longman, and C. Ware, 1759
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Page 241 - Kowould not go into the city; but were content to lodge in the niya. .fuburbs, and there take the provifions which they wanted. The Turks, apprehending that the emperor intended to con.quer their country, and fettle there, endeavoured to gain his affection by falfe offers of fervice : but after he had received fome of their children in hoftage, with guides, he left their frontiers, and pufhed into Armenia, where he was received with great honours. In a few days he proceeded t'o...
Page 111 - The emperor despatched ambassadors with rich presents, and a large sum of money to redeem him, and at the same time to conclude an alliance with Tangrolipix. The...
Page 23 - Magog, hitherto, it may not be amifs to give the reader fome account of them, and their country, from the Arabian authors, who pretend to be acquainted with both f.
Page 154 - Lz p. 185. following conditions : that the name of Sanjar fhould always be mentioned in the public prayers before that of Mahmud • that this latter...
Page 266 - Akftra. to the fea-coaft bounding the territories of the Franks. After this he began •his march for Syria ; and, when he drew near the Euphrates, the two brothers, taking their leave, returned with joy to their own dominions '. WE find no farther account in...
Page 333 - Shcnfi, from whence the kingdom took its name. To the weft of Hya lay Tangut ; a country of great extent, and formerly very powerful : but at that time reduced to a low ftate, and divided among feveral princes ; fome of whom were fubjeft to the emperor of Hya, and others to him of China. ALL Tatary to the weft of mount...
Page 223 - Sayfan had put to death, fet fpurs to his horfe, and gave him a (broke with his lance ; which Sayfan fnatching out of his hands, faid, with an air of contempt, I did not know that "women carried arms. Pulkheas, who was in his train, and held a correfpondence with his brother Mafut, pretending great zeal for his fervice, advifed him to retire to Tyganion, (O) a fmall city near Filomilion, where he was very kindly received (N) Here is a fudden tranfi- that, at firft fight, he Teems to tion from Kbliziaftlan...
Page 123 - Georgia, conquered, he deprived the great lords of their liberty, and obliged them to wear iron rings in their ears, as a mark of their flavery (H) : to avoid which ignominy, many of them turned Mohammedans.
Page 443 - ... who, finding himfelf deprived of this powerful ' aid, retired towards the river Sind, or Indus. There he halted, in a part where the ftream was moft rapid, and the place confined, with a view both to take from his foldiers a defire of flying, and prevent the Mungls from kinging up all their army to engage at once.
Page 333 - Katay, and was divided into two parts : that which belonged to China, was properly called Kitay ; and the part which belonged to Tartary...

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