Reinhold Niebuhr and John Dewey: An American Odyssey

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SUNY Press, 1993 - Biography & Autobiography - 358 pages
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Reinhold Niebuhr and John Dewey frequently have been identified as the most influential American philosophers of their respective times. Although their direct contact in print and in political action was marginal, their substantive conflict over such issues as religion, naturalism, the liberal tradition, and democracy both reflected and shaped much of America's inner dialogue from 1932 to mid-century and beyond. In this intriguing book, Daniel Rice makes a strong case that, although the clash between Niebuhr and Dewey was real and important, in a wider context the two shared more insights than either realized.
 

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Contents

The Early Years
3
Queries Pragmatic and Social
11
The Opening Attack on Liberalism
17
The Dialogue Begins in Earnest
29
A Common Faith
43
A Broadening Out of the 1ssues
59
Conflict in the Closing Years
71
The Major Issues
91
The Human Studies
115
Approaches to Religion
147
The Liberal Tradition
185
Democracy
217
Afterword
261
Notes
267
Index
351
Copyright

Conflict over Naturalism
93

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About the author (1993)

Daniel F. Rice is Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire and is the author of a correspondence essay on "Felix Frankfurter and Reinhold Niebuhr: 1940-1964" which appeared in the Journal of Law and Religion (I:2, 1983).

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