Introduction to the Synoptic Gospels

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, Nov 13, 2009 - Religion - 336 pages
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In this book respected New Testament scholar Pheme Perkins delivers a clear, fresh, informed introduction to the earliest written accounts of Jesus — Matthew, Mark, and Luke — situating those canonical Gospels within the wider world of oral storytelling and literary production of the first and second centuries. Cutting through the media confusion over new Gospel finds, Perkins s Introduction to the Synoptic Gospels presents a balanced, responsible look at how the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke came to be and what they mean.
 

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User Review  - Dr Paige-patric Samuels - Christianbook.com

Excellent, dealing with the various polemic arguments and priority over each source, this work will serve as a wonderful bridge for College and seminary students, to flagged the diverse hypothesis and to be able to articulate them. Read full review

Contents

What Is a Gospel?
1
Ancient Biography
2
Gospels and Apostles A Key Combination
11
Framing the Ministry and the Passion
17
Matthew and Luke Improve on the Model
18
Alternate Suggestions for Genre
23
The FourGospel Canon
26
Books and Believers in Early Christianity
31
Jesus in Marks Gospel
149
The Community Implied in Marks Narrative
153
Endings Added to the Gospel of Mark
156
A Secret Version of Mark?
158
Reading Matthews Gospel
164
Matthews Narrative Shape
166
Literary Features in Matthews Narrative
176
Characters in the Gospel
181

Early Christianity as an Explosion of Texts
32
How Books Were Written
37
How the Gospel Texts Have Come Down to Us
41
What the Text Critic Contributes
43
Scripture Cited in the Gospels
47
Marcion and the Idea of a SecondCentury Canon
51
The Quest for Sources
54
Comparing the Synoptic Gospels
56
From Q and the Gospel of Thomas to Sayings Gospels
67
Is It a Gospel?
85
Strata in Q
90
The Community Responsible for Q
92
The Shape and Function of Sayings and Stories
96
Sayings Material
98
Parables and Similitudes
105
Miracle Stories
114
The Passion Narrative
119
The Gospel of Peter and the Development of the Passion Narrative
121
Reading Marks Gospel
126
Marks Narrative Shape
127
Literary Features of Marks Narrative
133
Characters in the Gospel
142
Jesus in Matthews Gospel
189
The Community Implied in Matthews Narrative
193
Jewish Christian Gospel Traditions
197
Reading Lukes Gospel
202
Lukes Narrative Shape
204
Literary Features of Lukes Narrative
213
Characters in the Gospel
221
Jesus in Lukes Gospel
232
The Community Implied in Lukes Narrative
240
Mary Traditions and Other Infancy Gospels
244
The Reception and Revision of the Gospel of Luke
250
Gospels from the Second and Third Centuries
254
Oral and Written
256
Apocryphal Gospels and Reading the Synoptics
262
Gnostic Gospels from the Second and Third Centuries
268
The Gospel of Judas
278
The Gospel of the Savior
281
The Question of Genre Revisited
287
Index of Modern Authors
294
Index of Subjects
296
Index of Ancient Sources
300
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About the author (2009)

Pheme Perkins is professor of New Testament in the Theology Department at Boston College. Among her many published books are Reading the New Testament, Gnosticism and the New Testament, Galatians and the Politics of Faith and Peter: Apostle for the Whole Church.

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