The return of the Guards, and other poems

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1883
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Page 95 - Last night, among his fellow roughs, He jested, quaffed, and swore; A drunken private of the Buffs, Who never looked before. To-day, beneath the foeman's frown, He stands in Elgin's place, Ambassador from Britain's crown, And type of all her race. Poor, reckless, rude, low-born, untaught, Bewildered, and alone, A heart, with English instinct fraught, He yet can call his own. Ay, tear his body limb from limb, Bring cord, or axe, or flame: He only knows, that not through him Shall England come to shame.
Page 96 - ... calls! — with strength like steel He put the vision by. Let dusky Indians whine and kneel ; An English lad must die. And thus, with eyes that would not shrink, With knee to man unbent, Unfaltering on its dreadful brink, To his red grave he went. Vain, mightiest fleets of iron framed; Vain, those all-shattering guns ; Unless proud England keep, untamed, The strong heart of her sons. So, let his name through Europe ring — A man of mean estate, Who died, as firm as Sparta's king, Because his...
Page 95 - The Seiks obeyed ; but Moyse, the English soldier, declaring that he would not prostrate himself before any Chinaman alive, was immediately knocked upon the head, and his body thrown on a dunghill.
Page 257 - In danger's hour, before the rush of steel, Drifted away disorderly the planks From underneath her keel. So calm the air, so calm and still the flood, That low down in its blue translucent glass We saw the great fierce fish, that thirst for blood, Pass slowly, then repass.
Page 90 - Across the sand-waves of the desert sea, Then flashed at once, on each fierce clan, dismay, Lord of their wild Truckee. These missed the glen to which their steps were bent, Mistook a mandate, from afar half heard, And, in that glorious error, calmly went To death, without a word. The robber-chief mused deeply Above those daring dead. ' Bring here,' at length he shouted, ' Bring quick, the battle thread.
Page 18 - And the keen rider of the mare, With haggard looks of feverish care, Hangs forward on the speechless air, By steady stillness nursing in The remnant of her speed to win. One other bound — one more — 'tis done ; Right up to her the horse has run...
Page 92 - Our brethren, laid in honoured graves, may wear Their green reward,' each noble savage said; 'To these, whom hawks and hungry wolves shall tear, Who dares deny the red?
Page 96 - Yes, honour calls ! with strength like steel He put the vision by. Let dusky Indians whine and kneel, An English lad must die. And thus, with eyes that would not shrink, With knee to man unbent, Unfaltering on its dreadful brink To his red grave he went. Vain, mightiest fleets, of iron framed, Vain, those all-shattering guns ; Unless proud England keep, untamed, The strong heart of her sons. So, let his name through Europe ring — A man of mean estate, Who died as firm as Sparta's king, Because...
Page 94 - Though Mehrab Khan was brave, As chief, he chose himself what risks to run ; Prince Roostum lied, his forfeit life to save, Which these had never done." "Enough!" he shouted fiercely; "Doomed though they be to hell, Bind fast the crimson trophy Round BOTH wrists — bind it well. Who knows but that great Allah May grudge such matchless men, With none so decked in heaven, To the fiends' flaming den ? " Then all those gallant robbers Shouted a stern "Amen!
Page 120 - The gales that from the waters blow. Be thou a balmy breeze to him, A fountain singing at his side ; A star, whose light is never dim, A pillar, through the waste to guide.

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