The Trial of Colonel Quentin: Of the Tenth, Or, Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Hussars, by a General Court-martial, Held at Whitehall, on Monday, the 17th of October, 1814 ; and Continued, by Adjournment, Till Monday, the 31st of October, 1814 (Google eBook)

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Gale, Curtis, and Fenner, 1814 - Trials (Military offenses) - 280 pages
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Trial of Colonel Quentin for neglect of duty and allowing relaxed discipline in his regiment.
  

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Page 270 - His Royal Highness the Prince Regent has been pleased in the name and on the behalf...
Page 275 - Biblia Hebraica, or, The Hebrew Scriptures of the Old Testament, without points, after the text of Kennicott ; with the chief various readings selected from his Collation of Hebrew MSS., from that of De Rossi, and from the Ancient Versions; accompanied with English Notes, Critical, Philological, and Explanatory, selected from the most approved Ancient and Modern, English and Foreign, Biblical Critics.
Page 272 - ... therefore, commanded, that the officers who signed the letter of the 9th of August shall no longer act together as a corps, but that they shall be distributed by exchange throughout the different regiments of cavalry in the service, where it is trusted that they will learn and confine themselves to...
Page 271 - Quentin, would call for the removal from the service of those who have joined in it; but as His Royal Highness would willingly be guided by a lenient disposition towards a corps of officers who have hitherto merited his approbation, and would willingly believe that inadvertency in some, and inexperience...
Page 270 - Quentin, adequate to the degree of blame which attached to him, the Court do not feel themselves called upon to give any sentence upon this charge in the way of further punishment ; and they consider that any thing unusual in this determination will be explained by the singularity of the circumstances attending this charge, by which an officer is put upon his trial for conduct which had before been the subject of animadversion by those under whose command he was then serving, but which at the time...
Page 2 - Majesty's arms, to lessen the confidence of the troops in the skill and courage of their officers, being unbecoming and disgraceful to his, character as an officer, prejudicial to good order and military discipline, and contrary to the articles of war.
Page 269 - Charge.— For general neglect of duty, by allowing a relaxed discipline to exist in the regiment under his command when on foreign service, by which the reputation of the regiment suffered in the opinion of the Commander of the Forces, and of the...
Page 271 - Quentin's conduct, and those who, though absent, appear to have acted under a mischievous influence, by joining in an opinion to his prejudice, have all co-operated in a compact against their commanding officer, fraught with evils of the most injurious tendency to the discipline of the service : nor did it escape the notice of His Royal Highness, that this accusation has not been the momentary offspring of irritated feelings, but the deliberate issue of a long and extraordinary delay, for which no...
Page 272 - ... of the service in support of its discipline usually sanctions, upon the failure of charges against a commanding officer. Still it is essential that conduct so injurious in its nature should be held forth to the army as a warning in support of subordination ; and his royal highness has, therefore, commanded, that the officers who signed the letter of the 9th of August shall no longer act together as a corps, but that they shall be distributed by exchange throughout the different regiments of cavalry...
Page 271 - ... charges. In allusion to the letter signed by the chief part of the officers, and in which the present proceedings originated, the Prince Regent has specially observed, that, exclusive of the doubt which may be entertained of their capability to form a judgment, so much beyond the scope of their experience in the service, it was worthy of remark, that some who have affixed their names to that paper had never been with the regiment during the period in question, and others had never joined any...

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