Thomas Paine's American Ideology

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University of Delaware Press, 1984 - History - 327 pages
This book analyzes the entire spectrum of Paine's intellectual career between 1775 and 1787, not merely his attitude toward American independence. The author summarizes Paine's writings as an apprentice magazine editor, sketches the publishing history of Common Sense, explains its major philosophical doctrines and contemporary issues, and indicates the relations of these ideas to earlier manifestation.
 

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Contents

Preface
9
Writing and Publication of Common Sense
15
Common Sense and the History of Ideas
17
Paines Political Writing before Common Sense
27
A Runaway Best Seller
36
Theories of Government
47
The State of American Affairs
60
The Time Hath Found Us
74
Periodical Polemics
158
Plain Truth
179
Other Pamphlet Polemics
191
Four Letters and Later Writings on the Revolution
217
Four Letters
219
The Crisis
240
Retrospect on 1776
254
The Circle of Civilization
269

Intellectual Background and Reception of Common Sense
93
Levellers and Puritans
95
Relations with Locke
107
Locke Unraveling the Issues
123
Relations with Rousseau
137
Relations with Montesquieu
147
Conclusion
282
Appendix
286
Notes
292
Bibliography
316
Index
323
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