System and Process in International Politics

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ECPR Press, 2005 - Political Science - 260 pages
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System and Process (1957) broke the mould in political science by combining systems, game, and cybernetic concepts in its theoretical formulations. Since its publication, serious research in international relations has needed to respond to the bold hypotheses that matched equilibrial rules with type of system. 

Kaplan's life-long interest in finding an objective basis for moral judgments had its scholarly origins in an appendix of this classical book, which incorporated his understanding of philosophy and, in particular, the philosophy of science. A second appendix on 'The Mechanisms of Regulation' explored the cybernetic and recursive nature of knowing.

 

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balance of power

Contents

New introduction by the author
2
Foreword
8
Preface
10
ON SYSTEMS OF ACTION
18
The analysis of systems of action
20
The international system
35
The international actors
62
The regulatory process
90
The realm of values
140
The national interest and other interests
141
The theory of games
156
Some problems in game theory
173
Strategy and statecraft
190
Unified theory
219
The mechanisms of regulation
226
The realm of values
241

The integrative and the disintegrative processes
98
Processes and the international system
110

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Page 15 - ... In the first place, the mathematics of complicated interaction problems has not been worked out. For instance, the physical scientist can make accurate predictions with respect to the two-body problem, rough guesses with respect to the three-body problem, and only very incomplete guesses concerning larger numbers of bodies. The scientist cannot predict the path of a single molecule of gas in a tank of gas. In the second place, the predictions of the physical scientist are predictions concerning...
Page 15 - Moreover, the theory should be able to predict the conditions under which the characteristic behavior of the international system will remain stable, the conditions under which it will be transformed, and the kind of transformation that will take place.

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About the author (2005)

Morton A Kaplan is Distinguished Service Professor of Political Science Emeritus at the University of Chicago. He has written or edited 30 books and over 100 articles and monographs. The Political Foundations of International Law, co-authored by N de B Katzenbach, one of the leading books in its field, applied Kaplan's theories to international law, and was translated into numerous languages. 

Kaplan also organised many conferences; these included 'The Fall of the Soviet Empire', which he chaired in 1985 and conferences in 1980 and 1981 on South Africa, designed to abolish apartheid.

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