A History of the Boston Base Ball Club ...: A Concise and Accurate History of Base Ball from Its Inception ... (Google eBook)

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M.F. Quinn & Company, 1897 - Baseball - 241 pages
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Page 19 - A player running the bases shall be out — if the ball is in the hands of an adversary on the base, as the runner is touched by it before he makes his base; it being understood, however, that in no instance is a ball to be thrown at him.
Page 19 - Sec. 5 — Three balls being struck at and missed, and the last one caught, is a hand out; if not caught is considered fair, and the striker is bound to run.
Page 19 - A runner cannot be put out in making one base when a balk is made by the pitcher.
Page 18 - ... by being hit or the ball being grounded, the other side get their innings. When there are only two players left, a chance is given of prolonging the innings, by one of them getting three balls from the feeder ; and if he can give a hit such as to enable him to run the whole round, all his side come in again, and the counting is resumed. The feeder is generally the best player on his side, much depending on his skill and art. The scouts should seldom aim at the runners from a distance, but throw...
Page 17 - Theic may be five or more players on each side. Suppose that there are five. One player on the side that is out stands in the middle of the five-sided space and pitches the ball toward the hole. He is called the feeder. The batsman hits it off, if he can ; in which case he drops the stick and runs to the nearest station, thence to the third and all around if the hit has been a far one. The other side are scouting and trying to put him out, either by hitting the batsman (or runner) as he is running,...
Page 2 - ... HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY THE GIFT OF CHARLES H. TAYLOR CLASS OF 1890 OF BOSTON THE WORKS AND LIFE k OF LAURENCE STERNE.
Page 17 - This game is played with a ball and bats, or sticks something of the form of a policeman's truncheon. A hole is first made, about a foot across and half a foot deep. Four other stations are marked with pegs stuck into the ground, topped with a piece of paper, so as to be readily seen. Sides are then chosen, one of which goes in. There may be five or more players on each side. Suppose that there are five. One player, on the side that is out, stands in the middle of the five-sided space, and pitches...
Page 18 - ... in again, and the counting is resumed. The feeder is generally the best player on his side, much depending on his skill and art. The scouts should seldom aim at the runners from a distance, but throw the ball up to the feeder or to some one near, who will try to hit or to ground, as seems the most advisable. A caught ball also puts the striker out.
Page 19 - Section 1. — The bases shall be from " Home " to second base 42 paces ; from first to third base 42 paces equidistant.
Page 150 - Tenney's way is far different from that of other basemen. He reaches his hands far out for the ball, and stretches his legs, so that he is farther out from the bag on every throw than any other first baseman in the league.

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