The Battle with the Slum

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 1902 - History - 465 pages
1 Review
Splendid sequel to author's 1902 classic, How the Other Half Lives. Compelling real-life tales, accompanied by rare photographs and engravings, report on the status of living conditions among New York City's poor and exploited, including successful efforts to demolish breeding grounds of crime and the removal from power of Boss Tweed and the Tammany organization.
 

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Review: The Battle with the Slum

User Review  - Riley - Goodreads

Years ago, I read Jacob Riis' "How the Other Half Lives," and thought it was great. Recently, I read a biography of Riis that I also really enjoyed. This book come across like it is: dated. But there ... Read full review

Contents

I
ix
II
9
III
36
IV
63
V
76
VI
113
VII
154
VIII
175
XI
256
XII
264
XIII
310
XIV
341
XV
385
XVI
396
XVII
413
XVIII
441

IX
202
X
227

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About the author (1902)

Jacob Riis was a crusading journalist-photographer whose exposes of the living and working conditions of the New York City poor during the late nineteenth century inspired that generation of American journalists known as the Muckrakers. He was uncompromising in his commitment to his work, regarding journalism as a noble profession in an era when few others did. One of 16 children born to a part-time reporter in Ribe, Denmark, Riis emigrated to the United States as a young man and worked for a while as a carpenter. He got a job writing for the South Brooklyn News in 1874. For the next quarter of a century, he reported on "how the other half lives" for that paper, the New York Tribune (1877--88), and the New York Evening Sun (1888--99), documenting in prose and photograph the appalling slum life of New York's poor, the dreadful tenements in which they lived, the sweatshops where they and their children labored, the brutal crimes they committed and endured, and the police corruption that helped preserve these conditions. His harrowing portrayals of poverty and crime are classic works of photojournalism that influenced younger journalists and moved a future president, Theodore Roosevelt, to vow to clean up New York when he became head of the city's police board. Riis retired from active journalism toward the end of the century, becoming a popular lecturer and book writer. In The Making of an American (1901), a book still read today, he told the tale of his emigration and Americanization.

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