The New Civics: A Textbook for Secondary Schools

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1921 - United States - 420 pages
 

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Contents

Why Rights are protected by Negative Means
11
Some Rights that we have in dealing with Other Individuals
12
Rights against the Governments
13
Summary of Rights
14
The Connection between Interests and both Rights and Obligations
15
Some Other Public Obligations
16
Duties to Other Individuals
17
Social Criminals
18
CHAPTER II
21
What Kind of Education does a Citizen need?
22
Selfeducation as the Only True Education 23 24 Why Public Education must be not only Free but Universal
24
PREPARATION FOR LIFE AND CITIZENSHIP 25 Training in Citizenship in the School
25
Degrees of Selfgovernment in Different Schools
26
The Honor System
27
The Citizen in Business
28
FOUNDATIONS AND EFFECTS OF GOOD CITIZENSHIP 29 Character as the Basis of Citizenship
30
Knowledge and Ability
31
Civic Duty
32
Patriotism and Peace
33
CHAPTER III
37
Commercial Areas
38
Agricultural Areas
39
Minerals and Water Power
41
THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES 39 Population Past and Present
42
Distribution of Population Geographically
43
Distribution of Population Industrially
44
Original Racial Elements
45
Early Nineteenth Century Immigration
46
Recent Immigration
48
RACIAL PROBLEMS 46 Economic Effects of Immigration
49
Some Social Effects of Immigration
50
Immigration and Homogeneity
52
CHAPTER IV
56
Social Development through Individual and Collective De velopment
57
The Character of Social Organization
58
Customs
59
Limitations in the Development of Institutions
60
Limitations to the Development of High School Institutions
61
Social Control
62
POLITICAL ORGANIZATION 60 The State
63
The Proper Scope of Governmental Duties
64
The Need of National State and Local Government
65
Our National and State Constitutions 66 64 Representative Government through Political Parties 67 65 The Departments of Government 68 66 Our F...
69
Characteristics of American Government A Summary
70
Some Characteristics of the Economic Order Today
71
Private Property and Contract
72
Division of Labor and Largescale Industry
73
Cooperation and Markets
74
Production and Distribution 75 75 Civic Organization and the Citizen
76
THE AMERICAN HOME AND FAMILY SECTION TAGS THE IMPORTANCE OF THE AMERICAN HOME 76 The Family as the Sole Social Unit
79
Marriage in the Past
80
Society and Marriage Laws
81
Divorce in the Past
82
Changing Conditions which lead to Divorce
83
Divorce in the United States
84
Remedies for the Divorce Evil
85
THE HOUSEHOLD AS AN ECONOMIC UNIT 84 Economic Position of the Family
86
Size of American Families
87
Family Income
88
Standards of Living
89
Financial Problems of Industrial Victims
90
Women and the Future Home
91
PART II
95
CHAPTER VI
97
NOMINATIONS FOR ELECTIVE OFFICE 92 History of Nominations
98
Primary Elections
99
Importance of the Direct Primary
101
The People and the Parties in Nominations
105
Holding an Election
106
The Short Ballot
107
Who May Vote
108
Woman Suffrage
109
Problems of Elections
110
Efforts made to guard the Purity of Elections
111
Responsibility and Removal of Elected Officials
112
CHAPTER VII
115
The Permanent Party Committees
116
The Parties and Public Office
117
Bosses and Rings
118
ID The Voter and Political Parties
119
THE APPOINTMENT OF PUBLIC OFFICIALS in Appointments and Removals
120
The Spoils System
121
Development of Civil Service Reform
122
The Problem of Civil Service Public Control and Good Government
123
THE INITIATIVE REFERENDUM AND RECALL 116 Direct Legislation the Initiative
125
Use of Direct Legislation
127
Advantages of Direct Legislation
128
The Recall
129
CHAPTER VIII
133
SECTION PAGB OUR AMERICAN BILLS OF RIGHTS 123 Constitutional Protection through Bills of Rights
134
Freedom of Speech Press and Petition
135
Freedom of Thought
136
Constitutional Rights of a Person Accused of Crime
137
SAFEGUARDING OF MODERN SOCIAL RIGHTS 127 Freedom of Action
138
Rights of Workers and of Women
139
Safeguarding of Savings and Homesteads
140
Protection of Health and Life
141
The New Social Constitution
142
ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE 132 Our System of Courts
143
Use of the Jury System
144
Advantages of Jury Trial
145
Failures in the Administration of American Justice
146
The Necessity for an Upright Judiciary in a Republic
147
Enforcement of Law
148
Punishment of Adult Criminals
149
Prison Reform
150
Reform Schools
151
Juvenile Courts
152
CHAPTER DC
157
Private Property as a Social Institution
159
Protection and Taxation of Private Property
160
Taking Private Property for Public Use
161
Characteristics of a Good Tax
162
NATIONAL TAXES 148 Financial Powers of Congress under the Constitution
163
Internal Revenue
164
SECTION PAGE 151 Income Taxes
165
Miscellaneous National Taxes
166
The Management of National Finances
167
STATE AND LOCAL TAXATION 154 The General Property Tax
168
Corporation Taxes
169
Inheritance Taxes
170
CHAPTER X
174
The Municipal Charter
175
Three Types of City Government at Present
176
The Mayor
177
Commission Government
178
Merits of Commission Government
179
GENERAL PROBLEMS OF CITY GOVERNMENT 166 The Problem of Functions 180
180
Administrative Departments
181
Municipal Elections
182
Municipal Finances
183
WELFARE PROBLEMS 170 The Housing Problem
184
Fire Protection
186
City Parks
188
MunicipaPlaygrounds
189
Local Government in the United States 203 186 Counties and County Boards
204
Other County Officials 205 188 The American Township
206
Work of Rural Local Government
207
THE STATE LEGISLATURE
208
Importance of the Legislature 208 191 Organization of the State Legislature 209 192 The Process of Lawmaking
209
Limitations on the Legislature 210 194 Observations on the State Legislature
210
STATE ADMINISTRATION AND COURTS 195 The State Governor
211
Powers of the Governor
213
Organization of the State Administration
214
The State Courts
215
Sphere of State Action
216
Classes of Duties performed by the States 217 201 Uniformity and Diversity in State Legislation
218
Character of a State Constitution
219
Adoption and Amendment of a State Constitution 220 204 Contents of Our State Constitutions
221
THE NATIONAL CONSTITUTION HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT 203 Early American Unions
224
The Confederation
225
The Constitutional Convention
226
Work of the Convention
227
Adoption of the Constitution
228
THE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS 210 Need of Amendment
229
The War Amendments
230
Recent Amendments
231
THE WRITTEN AND UNWRITTEN CONSTITUTIONS 214 What the Unwritten Constitution is Like
232
Powers of Congress
233
The Presidency
234
The National Courts
235
THE NATION AND THE STATES 218 Classes of Governmental Powers
236
Relation of the State and National Constitutions
237
CHAPTER XIII
241
Sessions and Organization of Congress
242
Special Characteristics of the Senate
243
Special Characteristics of the House of Representatives
244
The Committee System
245
A Bill in the First House
246
Later Stages of Lawmaking
247
THE PRESIDENT 229 The Presidents Position
248
Election of the President
250
Presidential Term and Succession
251
General Powers of the President
252
The Power of Appointment
254
THE EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS 234 The Presidents Cabinet
255
The Heads of the Executive Departments
256
The Original Departments
257
Departments Added during the Early Years of the Republic
258
Recently Organized Departments
259
THE NATIONAL JUDICIARY 239 The Work of the Judicial Department
260
Judges and Jurisdiction
261
The Separate Courts
262
PART III
267
CHAPTER XIV
269
The State System of Education
270
Grammar and High Schools
272
School Finances
273
Wider Uses of the School Plant
274
Public Libraries
275
PUBLIC CHARITIES 249 Causes of Poverty
277
The Problem of Charity
278
Care of Dependent Children 279
279
Care of the Insane
280
Indoor and Outdoor Relief
281
Other Forms of Charity
282
HEALTH AND GENERAL WELFARE 255 Conservation of Human Life
283
General Health Regulations
284
Pure Milk and Meats
285
Pure Food Laws
286
LABOR AND INDUSTRY SECTION VAGK 261 The Laborer His Labor and His Wage
291
WOMAN AND CHILD LABOR 262 Extent and Effects of Child Labor
293
Public Regulation of Child Labor
294
Women as Wage Earners
295
Conditions and Hours of Womans Labor
296
Minimum Wage Regulations
297
EMPLOYER EMPLOYEE AND THE PUBLIC 267 Industrial Accidents
298
Workmens Compensation
299
The Problem of Unemployment
300
Some Aspects of Industrial Warfare
302
Conciliation and Arbitration
303
Government in Its Relation to Business
305
Protection and Organization of Industry
306
Successive Forms of Business Combination
307
Advantages and Evils of Combination
308
The Problem of Corporation Control
309
State Antitrust Laws
310
The Sherman Antitrust Law of 1890
311
Recent Application of the Sherman Antitrust Act
312
The Clayton Act
313
COMMERCE THE GOVERNMENT AND COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT 283 History of Means of Communication in America
318
Public Highways
319
Governmental Aid to Inland Commerce
321
Railway Problems and the Public
322
State Control of Railways
324
The First Interstate Commerce Commission 325 290 The Present Interstate Commerce Commission
326
Relation of Interstate Commerce to State and Foreign Trade
327
FOREIGN COMMERCE 292 The Government and Foreign Commerce
328
The Promotion of Our Foreign Commerce
329
Protection of American Shipping
330
The Consular Service
331
Our American Tariffs
332
CHAPTER XVII
336
History of the American Coinage
338
Our National Banking System
339
The Federal Reserve System
340
Wages and Prices
342
MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES 303 The Post Office
344
Newer Postal Work
345
Government and Agricultural Development
346
Development and Improvement of Our Food Supply
348
Protection against Storms and Floods
349
Indian Affairs
350
CHAPTER XVIII
353
Congressional Control of Colonies
354
SECTIOK PAGE 312 Government of Organized Territories
355
The Admission of New States
356
OUR POLICY REGARDING AGRICULTURAL LANDS 314 Public Land Policy in the Past
357
Agricultural and Grazing Lands
358
The Irrigation Law of 1902 259
359
Significance of Agricultural Land Policy
360
Our Forest Policy
361
Water Conservation and Water Power
362
Inland Waterways
363
Coal and Other Minerals
364
CHAPTER XIX
367
The Monroe Doctrine
368
The Making of Treaties
370
NATIONAL DEFENSE 327 The Need of Preparedness
371
The Army
372
The Militia
373
Coast Defense
376
The Problem of Military Preparedness
377
Real Preparedness
378
APPENDIX A The Constitution of the United States
383
B Area and Population of the States
401
Summaries on Citizenship and Government
402
Civic Problems
404
INDEX 49
409
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Page 398 - ... 3. The trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeachment, shall be by jury; and such trial shall be held in the state where the said crimes shall have been committed; but when not committed within any state, the trial shall be at such place or places as the congress may by law have directed.
Page 394 - Person. [2] The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it. [3] No Bill of Attainder or ex post facto Law shall be passed. [4] No Capitation, or other direct, tax shall be laid, unless in Proportion to the Census or Enumeration hereinbefore directed to be taken.
Page 396 - The President shall, at stated Times, receive for his Services, a Compensation, which shall neither be encreased nor diminished during the Period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive within that Period any other Emolument from the United States, or any of them. " Before he enter on the Execution of his Office, he shall take the following Oath or Affirmation...
Page 406 - XVIII [SECTION 1. After one year from the ratification of this article the manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purposes is hereby prohibited. SECTION 2. The Congress and the several States shall have concurrent power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
Page 395 - Term, be elected as follows: 2. Each State shall appoint, in such Manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a Number of Electors, equal to the whole Number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress...
Page 406 - SECTION 2. The Congress and the several States shall have concurrent power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. SECTION 3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of the several States, as provided in the Constitution, within seven years from the date of the submission hereof to the States by the Congress.
Page 394 - ... 7. No money shall be drawn from the Treasury, but in consequence of appropriations made by law, and a regular statement and account of the receipts and expenditures of all public money shall be published from time to time. 8. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States; and no person holding any office of profit or trust under them shall, without the consent of the Congress, accept of any present, emolument, office, or title of any kind whatever from any king, prince or foreign...
Page 396 - The Congress may determine the Time of chusing the Electors, and the Day on which they shall give their Votes ; which Day shall be the same throughout the United States.
Page 391 - ... each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a smaller number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to compel the attendance of absent members, in such manner and under such penalties as each house may provide.
Page 391 - Each House shall keep a Journal of its Proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such Parts as may in their Judgment require Secrecy ; and the Yeas and Nays of the Members of either House on any question shall, at the Desire of one fifth of those Present, be entered on the Journal.

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