The Jewish Neo-Aramaic Dialect of Am?dya

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BRILL, Dec 7, 2010 - Reference - 366 pages
This work is a linguistic description of an obsolescent dialect of Neo-Aramaic. The dialect was originally spoken by Jews residing in the village of Am dya (a.k.a Amadiya) in modern-day northern Iraq. No native speakers of this dialect remain in situ. They, along with the other Jewish communities of the Kurdish region, had all left by 1951. The majority went to Israel, where their numbers have dwindled. The dialect has not been passed on to the next generation, whose native tongue is Modern Israeli Hebrew. There remain but a handful of competent native speakers, whose speech has often been corrupted to varying degrees by exposure to Hebrew and other closely-related Neo-Aramaic dialects.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter One Phonetics Phonology
13
Chapter Two Nominal Morphology
43
Chapter Three Pronouns
77
Chapter Four Verbal Morphology
87
Chapter Five Verbal FunctionIndicative vs Subjunctive Moods
241
Chapter Six Adjectives
251
Chapter Seven Adverbs and Other Particles
257
Chapter Eight Numerals
261
Chapter Nine Texts and Translations
265
Chapter Ten Glossary
347
References
365
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About the author (2010)

Jared R. Greenblatt, Ph.D. (2008) in Hebrew and Aramaic Studies, University of Cambridge, currently holds a research post at Tel Aviv University and is working on a comprehensive lexicon of the inherited Aramaic component of the Jewish Neo-Aramaic languages.

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