Nixon, Kissinger, and Allende: U.S. Involvement in the 1973 Coup in Chile

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2009 - History - 177 pages
In the thirty-five years since the violent overthrow of Chilean President Salvador Allende, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger has vehemently denied U.S. involvement. Almost with the same breath, Kissinger suggests that the democratically elected Allende represented Soviet aggression in Latin America, therefore posing a threat to the United States' physical security. Newly released documents reveal the Nixon administration's efforts to undermine Allende, while indicating that Nixon and Kissinger did not believe the socialist regime in Santiago endangered the United States or even had close ties to Moscow. The White House feared that the Chilean experiment would encourage other Latin American countries to challenge U.S. hegemony. Nixon, Kissinger, and Allende explores the president's cultural and intellectual prejudices against Latin America and the economic pressures that induced action against Allende.
 

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Contents

Nixon and Latin America
1
Early USChilean Relations
19
Opposing an Election 1970
47
Undermining the Chilean Experiment 1971
85
Allendes Fall 19721973
111
Two American Victims
145
Bibliography
165
Index
171
About the Author
177
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Lubna Z. Qureshi earned her doctorate in history from the University of California-Berkeley in 2006. She also holds an M.A. from Temple University and a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her areas of research are U.S. diplomatic history and international history.

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