Elite Families: Class and Power in Nineteenth-Century Boston

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State University of New York Press - Social Science - 229 pages
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This book maps the development of a regional elite and its persistence as an economic upper class through the nineteenth century. Farrell s study traces the kinship networks and overlapping business ties of the most economically prominent Brahmin families from the beginning of industrialization in the 1820s to the early twentieth century. Archival sources such as genealogies, family papers, and business records are used to address two issues of concern to those who study social stratification and the structure of power in industrializing societies: in what ways have traditional forms of social organization, such as kinship, been responsive to the social and economic changes brought by industrialization; and how active a role did an early economic elite play in shaping the direction of social change and in preserving its own group power and privilege over time.
 

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Contents

Family and Economy
7
The Domestic Side of Kinship Networks
77
Patterns of Economic Continuity
115
Into the Twentieth Century
153
Conclusion
163
Genealogical Charts of the Lowells
169
Appleton Genealogy
176
Bibliography
209
Index
225
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About the author

Betty G. Farrell is Associate Professor of Sociology at Pitzer College.

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