The Linguistics of British Sign Language: An Introduction

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Mar 18, 1999 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 299 pages
1 Review
This is the first detailed explanation of the way British Sign Language works and is the product of many years' experience of research and teaching sign linguistics to deaf and hearing people. It assumes no previous knowledge of linguistics or sign language, and is not structured around traditional headings such as phonology, morphology and syntax. Instead it is set out in such a way as to help learners and their teachers understand the linguistic principles behind the language. There are sections on BSL grammar and also on the use of BSL, including social acceptability in signing, variation, and poetry and humour in BSL. Technical terms and linguistic jargon are kept to a minimum, and the text contains many examples from English, BSL, and other spoken and sign languages. The book is amply illustrated and contains exercises, as well as a reading list for further study. An accompanying 90-minute DVD is available from Talk With Sign Books. To find out more, visit http://www.talkwithsign.com/linguistics-british-sign-language-p-741.html.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Linguistics and sign linguistics
1
BSL in its social context
22
Constructing sign sentences
41
Questions and negation
65
Mouth patterns and other nonmanual features in BSL
81
Morphology and morphemes in BSL
99
Aspect manner and mood
115
Space types and verb types in BSL
129
Visual motivation and metaphor
174
The established and productive lexicons
197
Borrowing and name signs
216
Socially unacceptable signs
241
Extended use of language in BSL
254
Bibliography
277
Subject index
282
Index of signs in the text
288

The structure of gestures and signs
154

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information