Geisha: A Life

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Oct 15, 2002 - Biography & Autobiography - 320 pages
23 Reviews
GEISHA, A LIFE
"No woman in the three-hundred-year history of the karyukai has ever come forward in public to tell her story. We have been constrained by unwritten rules not to do so, by the robes of tradition and by the sanctity of our exclusive calling...But I feel it is time to speak out."
Celebrated as the most successful geisha of her generation, Mineko Iwasaki was only five years old when she left her parents' home for the world of the geisha. For the next twenty-five years, she would live a life filled with extraordinary professional demands and rich rewards. She would learn the formal customs and language of the geisha, and study the ancient arts of Japanese dance and music. She would enchant kings and princes, captains of industry, and titans of the entertainment world, some of whom would become her dearest friends. Through great pride and determination, she would be hailed as one of the most prized geishas in Japan's history, and one of the last great practitioners of this now fading art form.
In Geisha, a Life, Mineko Iwasaki tells her story, from her warm early childhood, to her intense yet privileged upbringing in the Iwasaki okiya (household), to her years as a renowned geisha, and finally, to her decision at the age of twenty-nine to retire and marry, a move that would mirror the demise of geisha culture. Mineko brings to life the beauty and wonder of Gion Kobu, a place that "existed in a world apart, a special realm whose mission and identity depended on preserving the time-honored traditions of the past." She illustrates how it coexisted within post-World War II Japan at a time when the country was undergoing its radical transformation from a post-feudal society to a modern one.
"There is much mystery and misunderstanding about what it means to be a geisha. I hope this story will help explain what it is really like and also serve as a record of this unique component of Japan's cultural history," writes Mineko Iwasaki. Geisha, a Life is the first of its kind, as it delicately unfolds the fabric of a geisha's development. Told with great wisdom and sensitivity, it is a true story of beauty and heroism, and of a time and culture rarely revealed to the Western world.
 

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Good book for information

User Review  - lovechef - Overstock.com

it was a great book if you are interested in the life of Geisha however the writing was not exciting nor well done. Mostly informative. I liked it but was not what I would call a great book. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - aliterarylion - LibraryThing

Every time I picked this book up, I fell asleep. I'm not faulting the author, but it took a lot of concentration to focus. I was not familiar with geishas and the terminology and Japanese names were ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction
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Afterword
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Acknowledgments
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Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Mineko Iwasaki, now fifty-two years old, is the mother of two daughters. She lives with her husband in a suburb of Kyoto, Japan.

Rande Brown is an internationally acclaimed translator of books in Japanese culture and philosophy.

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