Untouchable

Front Cover
Penguin Books Limited, 1940 - Fiction - 156 pages
96 Reviews

In Mulk Raj Anand's finest and most controversial novel he conveys precisely, with urgency and barely disguised fury, what it might feel like to be one of India's Untouchables. Bakha is a young man, a proud and even an attractive young man, but none the less he is an outcast in a system that is now only slowly changing and was then as cruel and debilitating as that of apartheid. Into this re-creation of one day in the life of Bakha, sweeper and latrine-cleaner, Anand poured a vitality, fire and richness of detail that have caused him to be acclaimed as his country's Charles Dickens as well as this century's greatest revealer of the 'other' India.

'It recalled to me very vividly the occasions I have walked 'the wrong way' in an Indian city and it is a way down which no novelist has yet taken me . . .' E.M. Forster

'One of the most eloquent and imaginative works to deal with this difficult and emotive subject' - Martin Seymour-Smith

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Vivid and moving writing. - Goodreads
This one was hard to read. - Goodreads
Brilliant writing... - Goodreads

Review: Untouchable

User Review  - Kobe Bryant - Goodreads

I liked the weak guy with indigestion who struggled to get water and was flustered by the pretty untouchable girl Read full review

Review: Untouchable

User Review  - Tanya - Goodreads

A day in the life of a sweeper boy, an 'Untouchable' told by Mulk Raj Anand, makes you feel guilty for the behavior of the people, you haven't met and actions, you haven't taken. Even after the ... Read full review

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About the author (1940)

Mulk Raj Anand, one of the most highly regarded Indian novelists writing in English, was born in Peshawar in 1905. He was educated at the universities of Lahore, London and Cambridge, and lived in England for many years, finally settling in a village in Western India after the war. His main concern has always been for "the creatures in the lower depths of Indian society who once were men and women: the rejected, who had no way to articulate their anguish against the opressors." His novels of humanism have been trabnslated into several world languages.

The fiction-factions include Untouchable (1935), described by Martin Seymour-Smith as "one of the most eloquent and imaginative works to deal with this difficult and emotive subject," Coolie (1936), Two Leaves and a Bud (1937), The Village (1939), Across the Black Waters (1940), The Sword and the Sickle (1942), and the much-acclaimed Private Life of an Indian Prince (1953). His autobiographical novels, Seven Summers (1950), Morning Face (1968), which won the National Academy Award, Confession of a Lover (1972) and The Bubble (1988), reveal the story of his experiments with truth and the struggle of his various egos to attain a possible higher self.

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