The Social Commonwealth: (a Plan for Achieving Industrial Democracy)

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Lincoln Publishing Corporation, 1914 - Social problems - 189 pages
 

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Page 20 - MODERN life has no more tragical figure than the gaunt, hungry laborer wandering about the crowded centers of industry and wealth, begging in vain for permission to share in that industry and to contribute to that wealth; asking, in return, not the comforts and luxuries o: civilized life, but the rough food and shelter for himself and family which would be practically secured to him in the rudest form of savage society.
Page 81 - The State has not merely the policeman's business of stepping in to arrest the wrongdoer, not the sole function of ruthlessly enforcing the fulfillment of contract, whatever these contracts may be and between whomsoever made; but the duty of providing such an environment for individual men and women as to give all, as far as possible, an equal chance of realizing what is best in their intellectual and moral natures.
Page 19 - ... opinion is that probably not over half of those in poverty ever apply for charity, and certainly not more than that proportion are evicted from their homes. However, I should not wish an opinion of this sort to be used in estimating, from the figures of distress, etc., the number of those in poverty. And yet from the facts of distress, as given, and from opinions formed, both as a charity agent and as a Settlement worker, I should not be at all surprised if the number of those in poverty in New...
Page 20 - Booth is but one of many students to observe that " the modern system of industry will not work without some unemployed margin, some reserve of labor.
Page 20 - ... for long periods of time large stagnant pools of adult effective labor power must lie rotting in the bodies of their owners, unable to become productive of any form of wealth, because they cannot get access to the material of production " ; and if at the same time " facing them in equal idleness are unemployed or under-employed masses of land and capital, mills, mines, etc., which, taken in conjunction with this labor power, are theoretically competent to produce wealth for the satisfaction of...
Page 20 - has no more tragical figure than the gaunt, hungry laborer wandering about the crowded centres of industry and wealth, begging in vain for permission to share in that industry, and to contribute to that wealth ; asking in return, not the comforts and luxuries of civilized life, but the rough food and shelter for himself and family, which would be practically secured to him in the rudest form of savage society.
Page 18 - ... it is not our purpose here to enter into a discussion of the moisture levels at which they will best develop.
Page 60 - Section 3. From and after January 1, 1937, every citizen of the United States who has been a resident of the State of Colorado for such period as the General Assembly may determine, who has attained the age of sixty years or more, and who qualifies under the laws of Colorado to receive a pension, shall be entitled to receive the same; Provided, however, that no person otherwise qualified shall be denied...
Page 49 - I know the language of that trade, that capricious trade, that fascinating buried-treasure trade, and can catch any writer who tries to use it without having learned it by the sweat of his brow and the labor of his hands. I know several other trades and the argot that goes with them; and whenever a person tries to talk the talk peculiar to any of them without having learned it at its source I can trap him always before he gets far on his road. And so, as I have already remarked, if I were required...
Page 125 - It does not require the eye of a prophet to see that this is true, that this is rapidly coming upon us.

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