Elements of Hippology

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Hudson Press, 1908 - Horses - 224 pages
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Page 179 - Never take a rapid gait until the horse has been warmed up by gentle exercise. Never put up a horse brought in a heated condition to the stable or picket line, but throw a blanket over him and rub his legs, or walk him until cool. When he is wet, put him under shelter, and wisp him until dry. Never feed grain to a horse nor allow him to stand uncovered when heated. Hay will not hurt a horse, no matter how warm he may be. Never water a horse when heated unless the exercise or march is to be immediately...
Page 9 - THE TROTTING STANDARD. When an animal meets these requirements and Is duly registered It shall be accepted as a standard-bred trotter: 1.— The progeny of a registered standard trotting horse and a registered standard trotting mare, 2.— A stallion sired by a registered standard trotting horse, provided his dam and grandam were sired by registered standard trotting horses, and he himself has a trotting record of 2:30 and Is the sire of three trotters with records of 2 :30, from different mares.
Page 150 - THE SHOE. The shoe is an artificial base of support, by no means ideal, because it interferes to a greater or less degree with the physiology of the foot, but indispensable except for horses at .slow work on soft ground. Since a proper surface of support is of the greatest importance in preserving the health of the feet and legs, it is necessary to consider the various forms of shoes best adapted to the different forms of hoofs. Certain properties 'are common to all shoes and may be considered first....
Page 152 - ... equal length. In fitting a shoe to a hoof of regular form we follow the form of the hoof, but in basewide and base-narrow hoofs, which are of irregular form, we must pay attention not only to the form of the hoof, but also to the direction of the pasterns and the consequent distribution of weight in the hoof, because where the most weight falls the surface of support of the foot must be widened, and where the least weight falls (opposite side of the hoof) the surface of support should be narrowed....
Page 9 - ... 4. A mare sired by a registered standard trotting horse, provided she is the dam of two trotters with records of 2:30. 5. A mare sired by a registered standard trotting horse, provided her first, second and third dams are each sired by a registered standard trotting horse.
Page 9 - ... from different mares. 3. A mare whose sire is a registered standard trotting horse, and whose dam and grandam were sired by registered standard trotting horses, provided she herself has a trotting record of 2.30 or is the dam of one trotter with a record of 2.30. 4. A mare sired by a registered standard trotting horse, provided she is the dam of two trotters with records of 2.30.
Page 9 - The progeny of a registered standard pacing horse and a registered standard pacing mare. "2. A stallion sired by a registered standard pacing horse, provided his dam and grandam were sired by registered standard pacing horses, and he himself has a...
Page 152 - ... directly over the white line, and its branches far enough from the branches of the frog to permit the passage of a foot pick. Branches of the shoe must be of equal length. In fitting a shoe to a hoof of regular form we follow the form of the hoof, but in basewide and base-narrow hoofs, which are of irregular form, we must pay attention not only to the form of the hoof, but also to the direction of the pasterns and the consequent distribution of weight in the hoof, because where the most weight...
Page 56 - ... any part of the body. We have next an irritation of the lymphatic vessels in the neighborhood of the chancres. These become swollen and then indurated and appear like great ridges underneath the skin ; they are hot to the touch and sensitive. The cords may remain for a considerable time and then...
Page 180 - ... uncovered when heated. Hay will not hurt a horse, no matter how warm he may be. Never water a horse when heated unless the exercise or march is to be immediately resumed. Never throw water over any part of a horse when heated. Never allow a horse's back to be cooled suddenly, by washing or even removing the blanket unnecessarily. To cool the back gradually, the blanket may be removed and replaced with the dry side next the horse.

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