Babrius

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Macmillan and Company, 1883 - Fables, Greek - 202 pages
 

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Page xxviii - God trying to reconcile their strife, and when he could not, he fastened their heads together; and this is the reason why when one comes the other follows, as I find in my own case pleasure comes following after the pain in my leg which was caused by the chain.
Page xxviii - How singular is the thing called pleasure, and how curiously related to pain, which might be thought to be the opposite of it; for they are never present to a man at the same instant, and yet he who pursues either is generally compelled to take the other; their bodies are two, but they are joined by a single head.
Page xxviii - Socrates, sitting up on the couch, began to bend and rub his leg, saying, as he rubbed : How singular is the thing called pleasure, and how curiously related to pain, which might be thought to be the opposite of it ; for they never come to a man together, and yet he who pursues either of them is generally compelled to take the other. They are two, and yet they grow together out of one head or stem; and I cannot help thinking that if...
Page xxxix - ... is an awful thing; and indeed I think that Euripides may have been right in saying, Who knows if life be not death and death life...

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