The Greek reader

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Hilliard, Gray, 1841 - Greek language - 516 pages
 

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Page iv - ... state, in the first place, that this edition contains the whole of the former text, with considerable additional matter, consisting of prose and poetry. To the poetical part, have been added some of the most beautiful and entirely unexceptionable odes of Anacreon, and extracts from Bion and Moschus. ' The text and Lexicon have been carefully compared, to ascertain what omissions, either of words or appropriate meanings, existed in the latter, to supply such deficiencies, and to insert the words...
Page viii - Grammar, is designed to enable the learner to begin immediately to exercise himself, in putting to practice the principles and rules which he has learned in the grammar. To direct his attention, the word in which the rule is exemplified in each sentence, is distinguished in the printing. — These , sentences, forming the First Course, are succeeded by a few Fables and a choice of the best Anecdotes and...
Page ix - Latin, as with his mother tongue. The practice of learning Greek through the medium of Latin has descended to us from a time when the Latin was a common language among scholars, when lectures at the universities were exclusively given in that tongue, and commentaries on authors and lexicons published in no other. For schools, however, there is no one circumstance to recommend the continuance of this practice, not even that of becoming more familiar with the Latin.
Page viii - ... the grammar. To direct his attention, the word, in which the rule is exemplified in each sentence, is distinguished in the printing. — These sentences, forming the first course, are succeeded by a few fables and a choice of the best anecdotes and apophthegms contained in the Greek writers ; which will not present undue difficulties to the learner well acquainted with the grammatical exercises that precede them. — The extracts in the department of natural history are from easy authors, and...
Page 314 - This manner of giving proper names to children, derived from any place, accident, or quality belonging to them or their parents, is very ancient, and was cuftomary among the Hebrews.
Page iii - It is proper to state, in the first place, that this edition contains the whole of the former text, with considerable additional matter, consisting of prose and poetry. To the poetical part, have been added some of the most beautiful and entirely unexceptionable odes of Anacreon, and extracts from Bion and Moschus. ' The text and Lexicon have been carefully compared, to ascertain what omissions, either of words or appropriate meanings, existed in the...
Page 364 - The Romans consecrated the first of April to Venus, the goddess of beauty, the mother of love, the queen of laughter, the mistress of the graces ; and the Roman widows and virgins assembled in the temple of Virile Fortune, and dis• Siiver*i Disquijiiticni.
Page ix - ... exercises that precede them. — The extracts in the department of natural history are from easy authors, and designed, in continuing the progress of the learner in the language, to afford him also amusing and instructive information.**** A chief object of the editor, in preparing this work, has been to furnish an elementary book to our schools, in which the Greek may be learned through the medium of the English. No learner, at school or elsewhere, can be as well acquainted with the Latin, as...
Page 318 - Some verbs of asking and teaching may take two Accusatives, one of the Person, and the other of the Thing ( 396).
Page 322 - Priam a cessation from arms for several days, purely by his own authority. The method that Achilles took to confirm the truth of the cessation, agrees with the custom which we use at this day ; he gave him hit hand upon .

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