Geographical readers for elementary schools, Book 4

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Contents

I
25
II
52
III
58
IV
69
V
89
VI
96
VII
113
VIII
140
XI
222
XII
247
XIII
253
XIV
259
XV
275
XVI
278
XVII
283
XVIII
292

IX
173
X
196
XIX
296
XX
300

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Page 57 - There was a sound of revelry by night, And Belgium's capital had gathered then Her Beauty and her Chivalry, and bright The lamps shone o'er fair women and brave men. A thousand hearts beat happily ; and when Music arose with its voluptuous swell, Soft eyes looked love to eyes which spake again, And all went merry as a marriage bell...
Page 165 - There are rivers whose course is longer, and whose volume of water is greater, but none which unites almost everything that can render an earthly object magnificent and charming in the same degree as the Rhine. As it flows down from the distant ridges of the Alps, through fertile regions, into the open sea, so it comes down from remote antiquity, associated in every age with momentous events in the history of the neighbouring nations.
Page 158 - Villingen, near a village called Swenningen, is the Source of the Neckar. This is indeed a land of fountains and of watercourses ; and though the height of the mountains is not great, and they have no glaciers, or perpetual snow, yet the reservoirs of the Black Forest feed with large supplies the two principal rivers of Europe. The flakes of winter snow which descend upon some of the ridges, nay, even the drops of rain falling on opposite sides of a house, in some situations, are destined to end...
Page 217 - ... no slimy river-beds — no black canals — no locks nor docks to divide the very heart of the place from the deep waters. If being in the noisiest mart of Stamboul, you would stroll to the quiet side of the way amidst...
Page 166 - ... 630 miles of uninterrupted navigation, from Basle to the sea, and enables the inhabitants of its banks to exchange the rich and various products of its shores; whose cities, famous for commerce, science, and works of strength, which furnish protection...
Page 226 - Moscow the locomotive runs for a distance of 400 miles, almost as "the crow" is supposed to fly, turning neither to the right hand nor to the left. For fifteen weary hours the passenger in the express train looks out on forest and morass, and rarely catches sight of human habitation. Only once he perceives in the distance what may be called a town ; it is Tver which has been thus favoured, not because it is a place of importance, but simply because it happened to be near the straight line.
Page 217 - If being in the noisiest mart of Stamboul, you would stroll to the quiet side of the way amidst those cypresses opposite, you will cross the fathomless Bosphorus ; if you would go from your hotel to the Bazaars, you must pass by the bright blue pathway of the Golden Horn, that can carry a thousand sail of the line.
Page 166 - ... various products of its shores ; whose cities, famous for commerce, science, and works of strength, which furnish protection to Germany, are also famous as the seats of Roman colonies, and of ecclesiastical councils, and are associated with many of the most important events recorded in the history of mankind ; — such a river it is not surprising that the Germans regard with a kind of reverence, and frequently call in poetry Father, or King Rhine.

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