Paxton's Magazine of Botany, and Register of Flowering Plants, Volume 10

Front Cover
Sir Joseph Paxton
Orr and Smith, 1843 - Botany
0 Reviews
Periodical devoted to the illustration in colour of new and uncommon plants grown in British gardens; although primarily horticultural in appeal, it contains the first descriptions of many new species.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 179 - Narcissi that may be thus raised, and most easily in potsť at his window, if not too much exposed to sun and wind, offering him a source of harmless and interesting amusement, and perhaps a little profit and celebrity. The six anthers should be carefully taken out before the flower which is to bear the seed blooms. This may be done through a slit in the tube ; and the yellow dust from another sort must be applied to the point of the style
Page 130 - I cannot omit the opportunity of again calling the public attention to the fact, that nothing more is necessary for the manure of a vineyard than the branches which are cut from the vines themselves. " My vineyard has been manured in this way for eight years, without receiving any other kind of manure, and yet more beautiful and richly laden vines could scarcely be pointed out. I formerly followed the method usually practised in this district, and was obliged in consequence to purchase manure to...
Page 253 - ... we had to grope our way along at a snail's pace in total darkness. This, in a country of such rough roads and deep and dangerous gulleys and water-courses, was a most intricate and difficult proceeding. Eventually, however, we reached our destination about nine o'clock at night. the crest of a hill at an elevation of 5,000 feet above the level of the sea. Along its sides are spread out every variety of habitation, from the substantial brick and stone structures, which are being erected with extraordinary...
Page 132 - We have not the slightest reason for believing that the nitrogen of the atmosphere takes part in the processes of assimilation of plants and animals ; on the contrary, we know that many plants emit the nitrogen which is absorbed by their roots, either in the gaseous form, or in solution in water. But there are on the other hand numerous facts, showing that the formation in plants of substances containing nitrogen, such as gluten, takes place in proportion to the quantity of this element...
Page 130 - ... men toiling up the mountains with unnecessary materials — I feel inclined to say to all, come to my vineyard and see how a bountiful Creator has provided that vines shall manure themselves, like the trees in a forest, and even better than they ! The foliage falls from trees in a forest, only when they are withered, and they lie for years before they decay ; but the branches are pruned from the vine in the end of July or beginning of August whilst still fresh and moist. If they are then cut...
Page 131 - Peter Miiller had a vineyard here which he manured with the branches pruned from the vines, and continued this practice for thirty years. His way of applying them was to hoe them into the soil after having cut...
Page 242 - ... accurately only in the chemical laboratory. Nature speaks to us in a peculiar language, in the language of phenomena ; she answers at all times the questions which are put to her ; and such questions are experiments. An experiment is the expression of a thought : we are near the truth when the phenomenon elicited by the experiment corresponds to the thought ; while the opposite result shows that the question was falsely stated, and that the conception was erroneous.
Page 132 - Rain-water can contain nitrogen only in two forms, either as dissolved atmospheric air, or as ammonia, which consists of this element and hydrogen. Now the nitrogen of the air cannot be made to enter into combination with any element except oxygen, even by the employment of the most powerful chemical means. We have, not the slightest reason for believing, that the nitrogen of the atmosphere takes part...
Page 253 - ... and another or two undescribed and insufficiently examined. They all inhabit the southern temperate regions of South America, and are capable of living with us in the open air through ordinary winters, especially if placed in a north-western exposure. The species now figured differs from D. dependens in its leaves not being at all serrated, and decidedly narrowed, not widened, to the base ; and also in having very short corymbs of flowers. With the others it is not necessary to compare it. It...
Page 68 - This is one of those beautiful little Myrtaceous plants peculiar to the South-west of New Holland, which might be easily mistaken for small Almond or Peach bushes, so much are the flowers like them, and so seldom do we find bright rosy blossoms among the Myrtles. It is a native of the Swan River Colony, and has been raised by Messrs. Lucombe, Pince & Co. of Exeter. The leaves when bruised smell very agreeably of lemon. It is a greenhouse plant, and requires to be potted in a compost consisting of...

Bibliographic information