Pacific Diaspora: Island Peoples in the United States and Across the Pacific

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University of Hawaii Press, Jan 1, 2002 - History - 384 pages
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Pacific Islander Americans constitute one of the United States' least understood ethnic groups. As expected, stereotypes abound: Samoans are good at football; Hawaiians make the best surfers; all Tahitians dance. Although Pacific history, society, and culture have been the subjects of much scholarly research and writing, the lives of Pacific Islanders in the diaspora (particularly in the U.S.) have received far less attention. The contributors to this volume of articles and essays compiled by the Pacific Islander Americans Research Project hope to rectify this oversight. Pacific Diaspora brings together the individual and community histories of Pacific Island peoples in the U.S. It is designed for use in Pacific and ethnic studies courses, but it will also find an audience among those with a general interest in Pacific Islander Americans.
 

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Contents

Pacific Diaspora?
1
Part One Identity
29
Part Two Leaving the Islands
67
A Ravuvu
87
Part Three Cultural Transformations
133
Diaz
169
The Dynamics of Aloha
195
Part Four Gender and Sexuality
219
Carolina E Robertson
262
Kekuni Blaisdell
279
E Victoria Shook
286
Part Six Hawaiian Nationalism
307
Jay Hartwell
322
Bibliography
355
Contributors
377
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About the author (2002)

Spickard is a professor of history at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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