An explanatory version of Lord Bacon's Novum organum

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Orphan School Press, 1852 - Science - 80 pages
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Page 32 - Among the idols of this class, we may reckon the propensity which there is in all men to find in nature a greater degree of order, simplicity, and regularity, than is actually indicated by observation. Thus, as soon as men perceived the orbits of the planets to return into themselves, they immediately supposed them to be perfect circles, and the motion in those circles to be uniform ; and to these hypotheses, so rashly and gratuitously assumed, the astronomers and mathematicians of all antiquity...
Page 79 - Credunt enim homines, rationem suam verbis imperare. Sed fit etiam ut verba vim suam super intellectum retorqueant et reflectant; quod philosophiam et scientias reddidit sophisticas et inactivas.
Page 75 - Eadem ratio est fere omnis superstitionis, ut in astrologicis, in somniis, ominibus, nemesibus, et hujusmodi ; in quibus homines, delectati hujusmodi vanitatibus, advertunt eventus ubi implentur ; ast ubi fallunt ( licet multo frequentius) tamen negligunt et prsetereunt.
Page 74 - Homines enim per sermones socian— tur; at verba ex captu vulgi imponuntur. Itaque mala et inepta verborum impositio miris modis intellectum obsidet. Neque definitiones aut explicationes, quibus homines docti se munire et vindicare in nonnullis consueverunt, rem ullo modo restituunt. Sed verba plane vim faciunt intellectui, et omnia turbant; et homines ad inanes et innumeras controversias et commenta deducunt...
Page 33 - Thus, as soon as men perceived the orbits of the planets to return into themselves, they immediately supposed them to be perfect circles, and the motion in those circles to be uniform ; and to these hypotheses, so rashly and gratuitously assumed, the astronomers and mathematicians of all antiquity laboured incessantly to reconcile their observations. "The propensity which Bacon has here characterised so well, is the same that has been, since his time, known by the name of the spirit of system. The...
Page 59 - The vulgar, who regard this metal as incombustible, and the chemist, who sees it burn with the utmost fury, and who has other reasons for regarding it as one of the most combustible bodies in nature ; — the poet, who uses it as an emblem of rigidity ; and the smith and engineer, in whose hands it is plastic, and moulded, like wax, into every form ; — the...
Page 76 - Intellectus humanus luminis sicci non est ; sed recipit infusionem a voluntate et affectibus, id quod general ad quod vult scientias: quod enim mavult homo verum esse, id potius credit.
Page 75 - At longe subtilius serpit hoc malum in philosophiis et scientiis ; in quibus quod semel placuit reliqua (licet multo firmiora et potiora) inficit, et in ordinem redigit. Quinetiam licet abfuerit ea, quam diximus, delectatio et vanitas, is tamen humano intellectui error est proprius et perpetuus, ut magis moveatur et excitetur affirmativis, quam negativis ; cum rite et ordine aequum se utrique praebere debeat ; quin contra, in omni axiomate vero constituendo, major est vis instantiae negativae.
Page 17 - ... of iron requires the application of the most violent heat that can be raised, and is commonly performed in tall furnaces, urged by great iron bellows driven by steamengines. Instead of employing this power to force air into the furnace through the intervention of bellows, it was, on one occasion, attempted to employ the steam itself in, apparently, a much less circuitous manner ; viz. by directing the current of steam in a violent blast, from the boiler at once into the fire. From one of the...
Page xxi - Sastras, as we welcome every spot of verdure in the desert ; and when the Hindus have only halted at a stage far short of that which we ourselves have reached, we should rejoice in being able to present to them our superior knowledge, not in the shape of a contradiction to anything that is false in their views, but as the legitimate development of what is true.

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