Down and Out in Paris and London

Front Cover
Penguin, 1989 - Authors, British - 215 pages
47 Reviews
To be poor and destitute in 1920s Paris and London was to experience life at its lowest ebb. George Orwell, penniless and with nowhere to go, found himself experiencing just this as he wandered the streets of both capitals in search of a job. By day, he tramped the streets, often passing time with 'screevers' or street artists, drunks and other hobos. At night, he stood in line for a bed in a 'spike' or doss house, where a cup of sugary tea, a hunk of stale bread and a blanket were the only sustenance and comfort on offer. Down and Out in Paris and London is George Orwell's haunting account of the streets and those who have no choice but to live on them.

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User Review  - unclebob53703 - LibraryThing

Fascinating look at the author's transitory experience as a poor person in two countries, very pointed social commentary, and a very absorbing story as well. Read full review

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User Review  - dbsovereign - LibraryThing

Orwell sees it all, and and we see through his impoverished eyes. We wash his dishes and tramp around in his clothing [with lots of holes]. We meet the people in his world and wish we could help them all... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
v
Section 2
xi
Section 3
xv
Copyright

11 other sections not shown

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About the author (1989)

George Orwell was born Eric Arthur Blair on June 25, 1903 in Motihari in Bengal, India and later studied at Eton College for four years. He was an assistant superintendent with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma. He left that position after five years and moved to Paris, where he wrote his first two books: Burmese Days and Down and Out in Paris and London. He then moved to Spain to write but decided to join the United Workers Marxist Party Militia. After being decidedly opposed to communism, he served in the British Home Guard and with the Indian Service of the BBC during World War II. After the war, he wrote for the Observer and was literary editor for the Tribune. His best known works are Animal Farm and 1984. His other works include A Clergyman's Daughter, Keep the Aspidistra Flying, The Road to Wigan Pier, Homage to Catalonia, and Coming Up for Air. He died on January 21, 1950 at the age of 46.

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