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Books Books 1 - 5 of 5 on ... which the element of art enters or should enter — that is to say, nearly everything....
" ... which the element of art enters or should enter — that is to say, nearly everything that meets the eye. However, on the other hand, Parisian uniformity may depress exuberance, it is the condition and often the cause of the omnipresent good taste.... "
Paris in Old and Present Times: With Especial Reference to Changes in Its ... - Page 197
by Philip Gilbert Hamerton - 1885 - 238 pages
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The New Princeton Review, Volume 6

Theology - 1888
...often the cause of the omnipresent good taste. Not only is it true that, as Mr. Hamerton remarks, " in the better quarters of the city a building hardly...endeavors to apply it to- little things as well as great," but it is equally true that the national sense of form expresses itself in every appurtenance of life...
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French Traits: An Essay in Comparative Criticism

William Crary Brownell - France - 1889 - 411 pages
...often the cause of the omnipresent good taste. Not only is it true that, as Mr. Hamerton remarks, " in the better quarters of the city a building hardly...endeavors to apply it to little things as well as great ;" but it is equally true that the national sense of form expresses itself in every appurtenance of...
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The International Library of Famous Literature: Selections from ..., Volume 16

Andrew Lang, Donald Grant Mitchell - Literature - 1898 - 9822 pages
...often the cause of the omnipresent good taste. Not only is it true that, as Mr. Hamerton remarks, " in the better quarters of the city a building hardly...endeavors to apply it to little things as well as great ; " but it is equally true that the national sense of form expresses itself in every Appurtenance of...
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The Oxford Book of American Essays

Brander Matthews - American essays - 1914 - 508 pages
...often the cause of the omnipresent good taste. Not only is it true that, as Mr. Hamerton remarks, " in the better quarters of the city a building hardly...endeavors to apply it to little things as well as great " ; but it is equally true that the national sense of form expresses itself in every appurtenance of...
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The Chautauquan, Volume 30

1900
...which the idea of true architecture is most generally prevalent. There the architectural tendency has become so habitual that, in the better quarters of...designed by some architect who knows what art is, and who knows how to apply it to little things as well as to great. Modern Parisian architecture has definitely...
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