A treatise upon modern instrumentation and orchestration: New ed., rev., corr., augmented by additional chapters on newly-invented instruments, etc. Op. 10

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Novello, 1856 - Conducting
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Page 254 - ... the passage — could not be uttered with firmness and unity ; the players, not watching the conductor's stick, could not know when he decides the second beat and resumes the movement suspended by the pedal-point. The obligation upon the performers to look at their conductor necessarily implies an equal obligation on his part to let himself be well seen by them. He should, — whatever may be the disposal of the orchestra, whether on rows of steps, or on a horizontal plane, — place himself...
Page 1 - ... compass, a detail of the mechanism, and a study of the quality of tone, and expressive character of various instruments; accompanied by numerous examples in score, from the works of the greatest masters, and from some unpublished works of the author. New ed., rev., cor., augmented by several . . . chapters on newly-invented instruments, and on the whole art of the orchestral conductor.
Page 245 - ... accent, and the forte tint. From the union, in a large band, of the 30 harps with the entire mass of bowed instruments playing pizzicato, and thus forming together another gigantic harp with nine hundred and thirty-four strings, graceful, brilliant, and voluptuous accents, in all tints and gradations. From the union of the 30 pianofortes with the six sets of bells, the twelve pairs of ancient cymbals, the six triangles (which might be tuned, like the ancient cymbals, in different keys), and the...
Page 254 - ... the conductor's stick, could not know when he decides the second beat and resumes the movement suspended by the pedal-point. The obligation upon the performers to look at their conductor necessarily implies an equal obligation on his part to let himself be well seen by them. He should, whatever may be the disposal of the orchestra, whether on rows of steps, or on a horizontal plane, place himself so as to form the centre of all surrounding eyes. To place...
Page 254 - If the rule just indicated were not observed, the passage could not be uttered with firmness and unity; the players, not watching the conductor's stick, could not know when he decides the second beat and resumes the movement suspended by the pedal-point. The obligation upon the performers to look at their conductor necessarily implies an equal obligation on his part to let himself be well seen by them. He should, whatever may be the disposal...
Page 245 - ... drums, forming a small orchestra of percussion, and almost exclusively rhythmical, the menacing accent, in all tints. From the mixture of the two gongs, the two bells, and the three large cymbals, with certain chords of trombones, the lugubrious and sinister accent, in the mezzo forte tint. How can I enumerate all the harmonic aspects under which each of these different groups, associated with other groups either sympathetic or antipathetic with them, would appear! There might be grand duets...
Page 287 - ... of the English use, now extant in the British Museum. These melodies are eminently adapted for Congregational use, and have been proved to answer better on the whole than more modern tunes. The harmonies are composed on the model of the great Harmonists of the best periods of Church Music. ГПНЕ PSALTER NOTED, AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS
Page 287 - THE PLAIN SONG used in the Morning and Evening Prayer, Litany, and Holy Communion ; taken from the best Authors, ancient and modern, and adapted to the present version of the Book of Common Prayer...

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