Sacrificial Logics: Feminist Theory and the Critique of Identity

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Psychology Press, 1996 - Philosophy - 216 pages
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Allison Weir sets forth a concept of identity which depends on an acceptance of nonidentity, difference, and connection to others, defined as a capacity to participate in a social world. Weir argues that the equation of identity with repression and domination links "relational feminists" like Nancy Chodorow, who equate self-identity with the repression of connection to others, and poststructuralist feminists like Judith Butler, who view any identity as a repression of nonidentity or difference. Weir traces this conception of identity as domination back to Simone de Beauvoir's theories of the relation of self and other.
 

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Contents

From the Subversion of Identity
112
Resistance Must Finally Be Articulated
135
Conclusion
184

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About the author (1996)

Writer Alison Weir received training to be a teacher with a concentration in history from the North Western Polytechnic. Before becoming a full-time writer, she worked as a civil servant and ran her own school for children with learning difficulties from 1991 to 1997. Her first book, Britain's Royal Families, was published in 1989. She is primarily a non-fiction author who writes about British royalty. Her books included The Six Wives of Henry VIII; Children of England; Eleanor of Aquitaine; Henry VIII: King and Court; Mary, Queen of Scots; and Isabella. Her first novel, Innocent Traitor, was published in 2006. In 2008 her second novel, The Lady Elizabeth, was published. Her works also include The Lady in the Tower - The Fall of Anne Boleyn (this book concerns the last four months of Anne Boleyn's life), The Captive Queen and A Dangerous Inheritance . She lives in Surrey, England.

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