AfterCulture: Detroit and the Humiliation of History

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Wayne State University Press, 1993 - Social Science - 216 pages
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AfterCulture is a book of essays about the making and un-making of middle-class culture, a phenomenon which has occurred nowhere more decisively than in America's most representative city, Detroit.
In this insightful book, Jerry Herron analyzes what has happened since the decline of middle-class culture in Detroit, a city he labels the first postmodern city, because it exemplifies the failure of traditional history to make sense of contemporary urban experience. By looking at media coverage of the city, violence, urban rehabilitation projects, and the proliferation of suburban shopping malls, the book traces the divestiture of Detroit and helps make sense of the plight of America's cities.

 

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User Review  - Tyllwin - LibraryThing

I'm reviewing this, and at some slight length, because it's an academic text that I think gets few casual readers, and fewer casual reviews. I've long thought that the decline of Detroit from a proud ... Read full review

Contents

Preface
9
Coverage
31
Shopping
75
Violence
117
Renewal
155
Conclusion
203
Bibliography
211
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About the author (1993)

Jerry Herron is a professor of English and the director of the American Studies program at Wayne State University. He received his Ph.D from Indiana University.

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