The Moor's Last Sigh

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Feb 16, 2011 - Fiction - 448 pages
2 Reviews
Time Magazine's Best Book of the Year

Booker Prize-winning author Salman Rushdie combines a ferociously witty family saga with a surreally imagined and sometimes blasphemous chronicle of modern India and flavors the mixture with peppery soliloquies on art, ethnicity, religious fanaticism, and the terrifying power of love. Moraes "Moor" Zogoiby, the last surviving scion of a dynasty of Cochinese spice merchants and crime lords, is also a compulsive storyteller and an exile. As he travels a route that takes him from India to Spain, he leaves behind a tale of mad passions and volcanic family hatreds, of titanic matriarchs and their mesmerized offspring, of premature deaths and curses that strike beyond the grave.


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The Moor's last sigh

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Moraes Zogoiby, the product of a mixed marriage, is a self-described "cathjew nut" living in the multicultural stewpot of Bombay. His freethinking mother, Aurora, heiress to a vast spice trade fortune ... Read full review

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Page 5 - I have lost count of the days that have passed since I fled the horrors of Vasco Miranda's mad fortress in the Andalusian mountain-village of Benengeli; ran from death under cover of darkness and left a message nailed to the door. And since then along my hungry. heat-hazed way there have been further bunches of scribbled sheets, swings of the hammer, sharp exclamations of two-inch nails.
Page 34 - To me, the doublenesses in Grandfather Camoens reveal his beauty; his willingness to permit the coexistence within himself of conflicting impulses is the source of his full, gentle humaneness. If you pointed out the contradictions between, for example, his egalitarian ideas and the olympian reality of his social position, he would answer with no more than an owningup smile and a disarming shrug. 'Everyone should live well, isn't it,

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About the author (2011)

Salman Rushdie is the author of seventeen books, including "Shame", "The Satanic Verses", and "Midnight's Children", which was named the "Booker of Bookers," the best novel to have won the Booker Prize for fiction in the award's history. Among his many literary honors are the Prix du Meilleur Livre Etranger, the Whitbread Prize, the European Union's Aristeion Prize for Literature, and a 2007 Knighthood for services to literature. 2012 marked the international publication of "Joseph Anton", his memoir of more than nine years spent in hiding due to the fatwa issued against him by the Ayatollah Khomeini.

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