Bacchylides: The Poems and Fragments

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University Press, 1905 - Athletes - 524 pages
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Page 425 - Nam Homerus pueros puellasque eius bis senos dicit fuisse, Euripides bis septenos, Sappho bis novenos, Bacchylides et Pindarus bis denos, quidam alii scriptores tres fuisse solos dixerunt.
Page 287 - It were best for mortals that they had never been born, and never looked upon the sunlight. But, seeing that these laments avail not, a man should speak of that which he can hope to accomplish. In the halls of the warrior Oeneus is there a maiden among his daughters like in form to thee ? Fain were I to make her my queenly bride.
Page 365 - Warriors of Troy, Zeus, who rules on high and beholds all things, is not the author of grievous woes for mortals. No, open before all men is the path that leads to unswerving Justice, attendant of holy Eunomia and prudent Themis : happy the land whose sons take her to dwell with them.
Page 287 - But, seeing that these sir. 5. laments avail not, a man should speak of that which he can hope to accomplish. In the halls of the warrior Oeneus is there a maiden among his daughters like in form to thee? Fain were I to make her my queenly bride.
Page 383 - gifts of the gods' suffice to prove the origin of Theseus. ' II legitime sa naissance divine sans se faire le serviteur du roi de Crète
Page 375 - Zeus my father, great and strong, hearken, if in very truth Phoinike's white-armed maid bare me to thee, Now send thou forth from heaven a swift Flash of streaming fire, A sign for all to know. Whereupon Zeus great and strong heard that immoderate prayer And planted honour infinite for Minos, Willing for his dear son To make it seen of all, Ay, sent the...
Page 275 - There, by the waters of Cocytus, he perceived the souls of hapless mortals, countless as leaves quivering in the wind, where flocks graze on the gleaming headlands of Ida.
Page 59 - ... maxims of conduct and the moral reflections which are strewn through Pindar's poetry express the peculiarly Greek feelings about life in an earnest and sometimes beautiful form. " One race is there of men, one race of gods ; and from one mother (Earth) we both have our being ; but in our power are we wholly separate ; for the race of men is naught ; but the brazen heaven abides, a dwelling-place steadfast for ever. Yet withal we have some likeness to the Immortals, perchance in lofty mind, perchance...
Page 287 - Yet a subtler poet would scarcely have made him say it here, within the gates of Hades, to Meleager, whose fate he pities. For the first part of the adage... inevitably suggests that other which is not spoken ____ Contrast the manner in which the whole yvu>I1.r) is introduced by Sophocles (OC 1225 ff.).
Page 420 - Thilo-Hagen) (versis Arcades armis) lugentum more mucronem hastae, non cuspidem contra terram tenentes, quoniam antiqui nostri omnia contraria in funere faciebant, scuta etiam invertentes propter numina illic depicta, ne eorum simulacra cadaveris polluerentur aspectu, sicut habuisse Arcades Bacchylides in dithyrambis dicit.

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