The Falklands War: Britain Versus the Past in the South Atlantic

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McFarland, Mar 25, 2008 - Social Science - 216 pages
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The Falklands War is an ideal showcase for how British policy evolved in the 1970s and 1980s. The background of the dispute over the island group in the remote South Atlantic (called Las Malvinas by the Argentines) is given first, then the events that precipitated the 1982 conflict and extensive examination of the military aspects of the war are provided. An overview follows of the many hypotheses offered for the British motivation to recapture the Falklands, showing that only those theories pertaining to the British perception of their national honor and the defense of democratic principles are significant. The Falklands War did not result in a dramatic shift in British defense policy, but did show the importance of external developments and political realism in policy formation, and these considerations are fully detailed here.
 

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Dr. Gibran has given an excellent account of the Falklands War. The book is well-written with an elegant style befitting someone trained in British academia. His analysis is rigorous and well documented. This book is remarkable for its lucidity and force of argument. An excellent piece of scholarship and an enjoyable read. 

Contents

Preface
1
Background to the Falklands War
13
The Falklands War and the Use of Military Force
53
British Motivations to Recapture
89
British Defense Policy After the Falklands War
121
Conclusion
161
Conclusion
167
Appendices
185
Bibliography
191
Index
201
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About the author (2008)

University professor and department head Daniel K. Gibran lives in Pegram, Tennessee. He is also the author of The 92nd Infantry Division and the Italian Campaign in World War II (2001).

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