Andre Lefebvre and the Cars He Created at Voisin and Citrodn

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Veloce Publishing Ltd, 2009 - Transportation - 144 pages
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 Together with his colleagues at CitroŽn, Andre Lefebvre created the Traction Avant (1934), the TUB (1939) – CitroŽn's first front wheel drive utility van that was succeeded by the H and HY vans (1947) – the Deux Chevaux (1948), and, last but not least, the DS (1955). 

From 1923 to 1931 Lefebvre also designed several highly original and outstanding competition cars and record-breaking automobiles for Voisin. He even drove some these cars in races and record attempts. It is obvious that during his 16 years with Gabriel Voisin he was very much influenced by the ideas of this illustrious aviation pioneer and car manufacturer. 

The experience gained during that period gave him the self-confidence to persuade his successive bosses at CitroŽn that his unorthodox approach to automobile design was what the company needed; first he convinced Andrť CitroŽn, later Pierre Michelin, then Pierre-Jules Boulanger, and finally Robert Puiseux and Pierre Bercot.

His oeuvre for CitroŽn alone earns him a place of honour among the great automobile designers of the past century. The fact that most present-day cars still carry the DNA of his design philosophy makes him stand out above other automotive pioneers and innovators. That is why it is amazing that so little is known about this fascinating and brilliant engineer. 

This book was written in order to remedy that, and to pay tribute to Andrť Lefebvre: the passionate pioneer who left car enthusiasts around the world such an important heritage.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Shrike58 - LibraryThing

Andre Lefebvre would be worthy of note if all he had done was create the Citroen 2CV. However, the man took his background in aeronautical engineering and made a sustained career of applying advanced ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I consider the book a real treasure trove, very entertaining and with a quite profound background.
Although you never get the impression Andre Lefebvre would be the chap you frequently go for a
drink it really tells a fascinating story of a fascinating man. How he changed the world as an engineer and creative person second to none. The book tells about the time, the social environment he dealt with and even describes a lot of technical detail. It rather holds back interpretations and meanings than telling facts and quotes from that time.
The book came to me as a present from a friend and hence I recommend that way to create a pleasant surprise. As an concerned I'd say the vocabulary is suitable for non native speakers, too.
 

Contents

I
3
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5
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IV
49
VI
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VIII
56
IX
57
XII
72
XV
106
XVI
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XVII
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XIII
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About the author (2009)

Gijsbert-Paul Berk studied at the Institute for Automobile Management IVA, Driebergen, and worked as an apprentice for Maurice Gatsonides (Gatso). As a post graduate, he did courses on industrial time- and production management and on marketing communications. His first job was as an assistant in the sports department of the Netherlands Automobile Club, KNAC. At that time he started writing articles for their magazine De Auto. Between 1955 and 1959 he was technical editor of AutoVisie, and the first Dutch journalist to road test the CitroŽn DS. He participated in various economy runs and was a member of the NAV team, organizing motor races at the Zandvoort circuit. After a stint as a freelance journalist, working for, amongst others, Car and Driver (USA) and Popular Mechanics, as well as writing and translating books, he became PR manager for Renault in the Netherlands. In 1973 he was appointed Deputy Director at the Amsterdam Exhibition and Congress Centre RAI, responsible for all communications. He has also contributed to a TV documentary on the 50th anniversary of the CitroŽn DS and was a member of the jury for the International Concours d’Elťgance at Het Loo, Apeldoorn (Netherlands).

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