The Englishman's Food: A History of Five Centuries of English Diet

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Medieval Gardens; cookshops, spices; ale, beer, wine and spirits; the food of peasants, labourers, townspeople, the wealthy, the poor and the country gentleman; fish meat and game; the feeding of infants, children; dairy products; vitamins, proteins, fat and fibre; the adulteration of food; the four bottle man; bread; poaching; tea, coffee and chocolate; food in schools and institutions; sugar and sweetmeats; root crops; the agricultural revolution; the importance of 'white meats', the vegetarian diet; menus and recipes. . . THE ENGLISHMAN'S FOOD was first published in 1939, fully revised in 1957 and now appears with a new updating introduction. A ground-breaking book, it is a fascinating and authoritative survey of food production, consumption, fashions and follies over a period of five hundred years. 'This fascinating book should be read from cover to cover. ' DAILY TELEGRAPH 'A tour de force. . . delightful reading. ' OBSERVER

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Contents

PART ONE MEDIEVAL AND TUDOR ENGLAND
15
PRODUCTION OF FOOD
17
QUALITY OF FOOD
34
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

Jack Cecil Drummond was born in 1891 and educated at King's College, London, where he studied chemistry. His working life was spent at the leading edge of theoretical nutrition. For twenty years he was Professor of Biochemistry at University College, London, where he met his wife Anne Wilbraham. During the Second World War he worked as scientific adviser to the Ministry of Food. He was knighted in 1944 and in 1945 he embarked on a new post-war career as research director of the Boots Pure Drug Company. An early member of André Simon's Wine and Food Society, he was a man of well-rounded interests with a remarkable gift for communication.

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