Etiquette: what to do, and how to do it

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Contents

I
3
II
61
III
91
V
123
VI
136
VII
156
VIII
168
X
177
XI
211
XII
245
XIII
277
XIV
314
XV
321
XVI
331
XVII
362
XVIII
396

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Page 32 - A table richly spread, in regal mode, With dishes piled, and meats of noblest sort And savour, beasts of chase, or fowl of game, In pastry built, or from the spit, or boiled, Gris-amber-steamed ; all fish from sea or shore, Freshet, or purling brook, of shell or fin, And exquisitest name, for which was drained Pontus, and Lucrine Bay, and Afric coast.
Page 162 - There is an infinite variety of motions to be made use of in the flutter of a fan. There is the angry flutter, the modest flutter, the timorous flutter, the confused flutter, the merry flutter, and the amorous flutter.
Page 61 - Now stir the fire, and close the shutters fast, Let fall the curtains, wheel the sofa round, And while the bubbling and loud hissing urn Throws up a steamy column, and the cups That cheer but not inebriate, wait on each, So let us welcome peaceful evening in.
Page 3 - Of all appeals — although I grant the power of pathos and of gold, Of beauty, flattery, threats, a shilling — no Method's more sure at moments to take hold Of the best feelings of mankind, which grow More tender, as we every day behold, Than that all-softening, overpowering knell The tocsin of the soul — the dinner-bell.
Page xii - Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them, in a great measure, the laws depend. The law touches us but here and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform, insensible operation, like that of the air we breathe in.
Page 137 - tis growing old ; but I literally seem to have murdered a man whose name was Ennui, for his ghost is ever before me. They say there is no English word for ennui; I think you may translate it most literally by what is called "entertaining people...
Page 57 - Nor do they trust their tongues alone, But speak a language of their own ; Can read a nod, a shrug, a look, Far better than a...
Page xii - The person who screams, or uses the superlative degree, or converses with heat, puts whole drawing-rooms to flight. If you wish to be loved, love measure.
Page 57 - I know there are a set of malicious, prating, prudent gossips, both male and female, who murder characters to kill time ; and will rob a young fellow of his good name before he has years to know the value of it.
Page 339 - ... which, if you have incautiously put yourself into a bad and dangerous position, you cannot obtain your enemy's leave to withdraw your troops, and place them more securely, but you must abide all the consequences of your rashness. And, lastly, we learn by chess the habit of not being discouraged by present bad appearances in the state of our affairs, the habit of hoping for a favourable change, and that of persevering in the search of resources.

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