Seldeniana, Or, The Table-talk of John Selden, Esq;: Being His Sense of Various Matters of Weight and Consequence; Relating Especially to Religion and State..

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W. Otridge and Son; R. Faulder; J. Cuthell; R. Lea; Ogilvy and Son; J. Nunn; J. Walker; E. Jeffrey; Lackington, Allen, and Company; and Vernor and Hood., 1798 - Anecdotes - 136 pages
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Page 74 - In all times the Princes in England have done something illegal to get Money: but then came a Parliament and all was well; the People and the Prince kissed and were Friends, and so things were quiet for a while. Afterwards there was another Trick found out to get Money, and after they had got it, another Parliament was called to set all right, &c. But now they have so out-run the Constable...
Page 5 - Bible as well as King James's. The Translators in King James's time took an excellent way. That Part of the Bible was given to him who was most excellent in such a Tongue (as the Apocrypha to Andrew Downs) and...
Page 6 - ... units, &c., and that he had in all but ten pounds : the other that sees him, takes not the figures together as he doth, but picks here and there, and thereupon reports that he...
Page 85 - Commonwealth, they both please themselves alike, only we commend that, whereby we ourselves receive some benefit; as if a man place his delight in things that tend to the common good. He that takes pleasure to hear Sermons, enjoys himself as much as he that hears Plays ; and could he that loves Plays endeavour to love Sermons, possibly he might bring himself to it as well as to any other Pleasure.
Page 19 - IT is the trial of a man to see if he will change his side : and if he be so weak as to change once, he will change again. Your Country fellows have a way to try if a man be Weak in the hams, by coming behind him and giving him a blow unawares ; if he bend once, he will bend again.
Page 64 - THOUGH some make slight of libels, yet you may see by them how the wind sits : as take a straw and throw it up into the air, you shall see by that which way the wind is, which you shall not do by casting up a stone. More solid things do not show the complexion of the times so well as ballads and libels.
Page 54 - A KING is a thing men have made for their own sakes, for quietness sake. Just as. in a family one man is appointed to buy the meat...
Page 108 - Sirrah, says he, do you not know me, that you use no reverence ? — Yes...
Page 125 - The rack is used no where as in England : in other countries it is used in judicature, when there is a semiplena probatio, a half proof against a man; then to see if they can make it full, they rack him if he will not confess. But here in England they take a man and rack him, I do not know why, nor when ; not in time of judicature, but when somebody bids.
Page 37 - Equity is a Roguish thing, for Law we have a measure, know what to trust to, Equity is according to the Conscience of him that is Chancellor, and as that is larger or narrower, so is Equity. 'Tis all one as if they should make the Standard for the measure, we call [a Foot] a Chancellor's Foot, what an uncertain Measure would this be?

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