Zofloya; Or, The Moor: A Romance of the Fifteenth Century. In Three Volumes, Volume 2

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1806 - 236 pages
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The storyline is difficult to follow since volume III is the only section contained in this e-book. There are 33 chapters to this book and only chapters 13-25 are contained here. Disappointing.

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Page 292 - Memoirs, written by himself ; containing his literary and political Life, and Anecdotes of the principal Characters of the eighteenth Century.
Page 104 - Eminently indeed calculated to excite an ardent love in youth, was the mind and person of the orphan Lilla. Pure, innocent, free even from the smallest taint of a corrupt thought, was her mind ; delicate, symmetrical, and of fairy-like beauty, her person so small, yet of so just proportion ; sweet, expressing a seraphic serenity of soul, seemed her angelic countenance, slightly suffused with the palest hue of the virgin rose. Long flaxen hair floated over her shoulders : she might have personified...
Page 114 - Why be should be connected with her dreams, who never entered her mind when waking, she could not divine : but certain it was, that his exact resemblance, though as it were of polished and superior appearance, had figured chiefly in her troubled sight. She next reverted to the terrible moment in which she beheld joined the hands of Lilla and Henriquez, but that Zofloya had offered to prevent the marriage. On this incident she pondered with a sensation of pleasure, and Berenza, bleeding and dying...
Page 291 - The pleasures of melancholy are suited only to minds of uncommon susceptibility, — to those persons who may be said to have a sympathetic taste for distress; and from readers of this class, the tale of woe now before us will meet with peculiar acceptance. For ourselves, we own that we have been truly affected by the perusal of it, since it is replete with interest, and possesses pathos enough to affect the heart of the most callous of critical readers.
Page 14 - Leonardo, however, arrested her attention, and she softly approached to contemplate him — his hands were clasped over his head, and on his cheek, where the hand of health had planted her brown-red rose, the pearly gems of his tears still hung — his auburn hair sported in graceful curls about his forehead and temples, agitated by the passing breeze — his vermeil lips were half open, and disclosed his polished teeth — his bosom, which he had uncovered to admit the refreshing air, remained disclosed,...
Page 16 - His cheeks became suffused with deepening blushes, and his eyes, with which he longed to gaze upon her, were yet cast bashfully towards the earth.
Page 33 - Megalena possessed overhim an unlimited power; she had caused a new world to open on his view; even yet he was not awakened from the dream of pleasure with which she had bewitched his soul: feelings and ideas, unknown before; swelled in his bosom, and his heart was rapidly becoming immersed in an infatuating sea of voluptuousness.
Page 290 - Simple tales: The black velvet pelisse; The death-bed; The fashionable wife and unfashionable husband; The robber; The mother and son; Love and duty; The soldier's return; The brother and sister; The revenge; The uncle and nephew; Murder will out; The orphan; The father and daughter ; Happy faces.
Page 111 - ... beautiful and serene. These passed gradually; when, as if from the midst of them, she beheld advancing a Moor, of a noble and majestic form. He was clad in a habit of white and gold ; on his head he wore a white turban, which sparkled with emeralds, and was surmounted by a waving feather of green; his arms and legs, which were bare, were encircled with the finest oriental pearl; he wore a collar of gold round his throat, and his ears were decorated with gold rings of an enormous size.

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