Reliques of Ancient English Poetry: Consisting of Old Heroic Ballads, Songs, and Other Pieces of Our Earlier Poets; Together with Some Few of Later Date, Volume 2

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H. Washbourne and Company, 1847 - Ballads, English - 420 pages
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Page 369 - Why so pale and wan, fond lover? Prithee, why so pale? Will, when looking well can't move her, Looking ill prevail? Prithee, why so pale?
Page 334 - You meaner beauties of the night, That poorly satisfy our eyes More by your number than your light, You common people of the skies; What are you when the moon shall rise?
Page 324 - Tell zeal it wants devotion, Tell love it is but lust, Tell time it is but motion, Tell flesh it is but dust ; And wish them not reply, For thou must give the lie.
Page 344 - The sweetness, mercy, majesty, And glories of my King; When I shall voice aloud, how good He is, how great should be; Enlarged winds that curl the flood, Know no such liberty. Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage; Minds innocent and quiet take That for an hermitage; If I have freedom in my love, And in my soul am free; Angels alone that soar above, Enjoy such liberty.
Page 331 - How soone he may ride this whole world about: And at the third question I must not shrinke, But tell him there truly what he does thinke.
Page 387 - Lero, lero, liliburlero,' that made an impression on the [king's] army, that cannot be imagined by those that saw it not. The whole army, and at last the people, both in city and country, were singing it perpetually. And perhaps never had so slight a thing so great an effect.
Page 333 - The king he laughed, and swore by St. Jone, I did not think it could be gone so soone! — Now from the third question thou must not shrinke, But tell me here truly what I do thinke.
Page 402 - COME listen to my mournful tale. Ye tender hearts, and lovers dear ; Nor will you scorn to heave a sigh, Nor will you blush to shed a tear. And thou, dear Kitty, peerless maid, Do thou a pensive ear incline ; For thou canst weep at every woe, And pity every plaint, but mine. Young Dawson was a gallant...
Page 332 - fore our fader the pope. Now welcome, sire abbot, the king he did say, Tis well thou'rt come back to keepe thy day; For and if thou canst answer my questions three, Thy life and thy living both saved shall bee.
Page 329 - KING JOHN AND THE ABBOT OF CANTERBURY An ancient story He tell you anon Of a notable prince, that was called King John; And he ruled England with maine and with might, For he did great wrong, and maintein'd little right.

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