Progress and Its Discontents

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Gabriel A. Almond, Gabriel Abraham Almond, Marvin Chodorow, Roy Harvey Pearce, American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Western Center
University of California Press, Jan 1, 1982 - Social Science - 565 pages
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Contents

Part I
17
GEORG G IGGERS
41
The Idea of Progress in Communist Ideology
67
Ideas of Progress in the Third World
83
The Evolutionary Concept of Progress
106
Part II
125
JOHN T EDSALL
135
GERALD FEINBERG
161
NATHAN ROSENBERG
301
Poverty and Progress
319
Part IV
333
AARON WILDAVSKY
361
G BINGHAM POWELL
375
SAMUEL H BARNES
403
Part V
427
MURRAY KRIEGER
449

DAVIS
182
GERALD HOLTON
202
MARC J ROBERTS
226
Progress Paradigms
240
Part III
249
Can Technology Assure Unending Material Progress?
281
ELLIOTT
470
MARTIN E MARTY
482
DANIEL BELL
501
An Ethical Appraisal
524
Contributors
547
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

Born in Rock Island, Illinois, American political scientist Gabriel Almond was educated at the University of Chicago. During World War II, he was associated with the Office of War Information and also with the War Department in Europe. After the war he served on the faculties of several universities, including Princeton University, Yale University, and Stanford University. He has also been visiting professor at the University of Tokyo and the University of Belo Horizonte in Brazil as well as a consultant to the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Air Force. Almond is most noted for his work in comparative politics and comparative political systems. He is the author and coauthor of several landmark books, including The Civic Culture: Political Attitudes and Democracy in Five Nations The Civic Culture: (1963), a seminal piece in the field (coauthored with Sidney Verba). Among Almond's other well-known works are The Politics of Developing Areas (1960) and Comparative Politics: A Developmental Approach (1966). A member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Political Science Association, Almond received the James Madison Award in 1972 for his work in the field.

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