Some Insects Injurious to Garden and Orchard Crops: A Series of Articles Dealing with Insects of this Class, Volumes 16-22

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U.S. Department of Agriculture, Division of Entomology, 1899 - Fruit - 99 pages
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Page 152 - CYANIPENNIS GERM. What appears to be the first record of the occurrence of this species in America is by the late William Juelich, in volume V of Entomologica Americana (March, 1899, p. 57), in a note in which he refers to a series of specimens taken by the writer at Ithaca, NY, and to others found by Dr. Otto Lugger at Baltimore, Md. The writer first observed this species about 1879, but there were at that time in the collection of the Cornell University a series of this weevil taken in the same...
Page 40 - ... plow deeply in spring, or reverse the process, to prevent the moths from issuing ; to encourage the growth of secondary roots by covering the vines at the joints with earth; to destroy dead vines and old plants as soon as the crop is made; to keep the plants in vigorous condition, free from other insects and diseases ; to cut out such borers as may succeed in entering the vines, which they will sometimes do in spite of the observance of precautionary measures; and to capture the moths early in...
Page 92 - Soc., vol. xx, p. 76), published in 18!>3. It is there stated to occur from Canada to the New England and Middle States westward to Wisconsin, and is stated on the authority of LeConte to be found also in North Carolina, the type locality. The following list includes more exact localities from recorded notes and from specimens in the National Museum and other local collections: Berlin Falls, Mount Washington, Mount Adams, N.
Page 37 - It is shining mahogany brown in color and its head is ornamented in front just above and between the eyes with a horn-like process. By means of this the pupa cuts its way out of one end of its cocoon, and by the aid of the abdominal hook-like spines forces itself to the surface of the earth before transforming to imago.
Page 63 - San Diego, and elsewhere in Texas; New Mexico; Colorado; Wasatch, Utah. The egg. — Elongate, more than three times as long as wide, somewhat variable in outline owing to close deposition, subcylindrical, sometimes slightly curved on one side, broadly rounded at each end; surface smooth, shining, with no apparant sculpture; color light dull yellow...
Page 62 - ... both species are able to jump many times their own length, and when disturbed they hop from the leaves like fleabeetles. They have also been observed to feed upon red clover in the manner and with the effect described above." Mr. Chittenden thinks that the most feasible method of treatment would be the use of kerosene in some of its forms. A spray of kerosene emulsion, as strong as the plant will bear without injury, would doubtless be effective in the destruction of the bugs in all stages, or...
Page 28 - Of other methods in general use against this species are hand-picking early in the season and the trapping of the bugs by means of boards, pieces of bark, or similar material, placed about on the ground in the garden. Protection to cucurbits other than squash and perhaps pumpkin can be secured, as was demonstrated during the past two years in the writer's experience, by growing these plants with the others to serve as trap crops. Attack will thus be centered upon a few plants, where the insects can...
Page 126 - Systcna blanda of Melsheimer. This insect is about .12 of an inch in length, and of a light creamy clay-color, having three longitudinal darker stripes on the wing-covers. These insects vary very much in color. Mr. Nixon writes that the beetles have nearly devastated a field of corn, eating the leaves and leaving the bare stalks standing. They hop like a flea, and when disturbed hide themselves in the soil, if they have not time to escape by flying away. They are very active and voracious, and being...
Page 90 - Hour or road dust, Bordeaux mixture, and Paris green, combined or alone, it has been suggested by Dr. Howard that the destruction of weeds of the family Solanacea^ around the margins of fields and gardens will result in positive benefit in the reduction of the numbers of these flea-beetles as well as of numerous other insects which infest solanaceous crop plants. He suggests, also, the growing of a few clumps of jimson weed or nightshade as trap crops for the beetles, the plants to be thoroughly...
Page 59 - Living in great numbers on the under side of the leaves of the garden bean, puncturing the tissues, and sucking the sap, and by these punctures causing the death of the tissues in small, irregular patches that appear upon the upper surface of the leaf as white spots. These two species are so nearly alike, so far as habits are concerned, that they may be noticed together. They operate mostly near the ground and upon weak, low-growing sorts. They sometimes do appreciable injury to the plant. The insects...

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