The Physics of Coronary Blood Flow

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Jun 8, 2005 - Medical - 408 pages
The fields of biological and medical physics and biomedical engineering are broad, multidisciplinary and dyanmic. They lie at the crossroads of frontier - search in physics, biology, chemistry, and medicine. The Biological & Me- cal Physics/Biomedical Engineering Series is intended to be comprehensive, covering a broad range of topics important to the study of the physical, che- cal and biological sciences. Its goal is to provide scientists and engineers with textbooks, monographs, and reference works to address the growing need for information. Books in the series emphasize established and emergent areas of science - cluding molecular, membrane, and mathematical biophysics; photosynthetic - ergy harvesting and conversion; information processing; physical principles of genetics; sensory communications; automata networks, neural networks, and cellular automata. Equally important will be coverage of applied aspects of b- logical and medical physics and biomedical engineering such as molecular el- tronic components and devices, biosensors, medicine, imaging, physical prin- ples of renewable energy production, advanced prostheses, and environmental control and engineering. Elias Greenbaum Oak Ridge, TN M. Zamir Department of Applied Mathematics University of Western Ontario London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 CANADA zamir@uwo.ca Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Zamir, M. (Mair) The physics of coronary blood flow / M. Zamir. p. cm. — (Biological and medical physics, biomedical engineering) Includes bibliographical references and index. 1. Coronary circulation. 2. Hemodynamics. 3. Blood flow. I. Title. II. Series. QP108.Z36 2005 612.1?7—dc22 2005042502 ISBN-10: 0-387-25297-5 e-ISBN: 0-387-26019-6 Printed on acid-free paper.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Static Design Issues
1
12 Heart Disease?
3
13 Origin of Coronary Blood Supply
5
14 Coronary Arteries
7
15 LeftRight Dominance
12
16 Branching Structure
14
17 Underlying Design?
21
18 Coronary Flow Reserve
27
57 Summary
174
Composite PressureFlow Relations
177
62 Composite PressureFlow Relations Under Pure Resistance
179
Cardiac Pressure Wave
181
64 Composite PressureFlow Relations Under General Impedance
186
65 Composite PressureFlow Relations Under Inertial Effects
190
66 Composite PressureFlow Relations Under Capacitance Effects
198
67 Composite PressureFlow Relations Under RLC in Series
207

19 Design Conflict?
31
110 Summary
32
Modelling Preliminaries
35
22 The Lumped Model Concept
37
23 Flow in a Tube
38
Resistance to Flow
41
Inductance
45
Capacitance
56
Wave Propagation
62
28 Mechanical Analogy
66
29 Electrical Analogy
71
210 Summary
75
Basic Lumped Elements
79
32 RLC System in Series
81
33 Free Dynamics of the RLC System in Series
84
34 R1R2 in Parallel
88
35 RL in Parallel
92
36 RC in Parallel
97
37 RLC System in Parallel Under Constant Pressure
101
38 RLC System in Parallel Under Constant Flow
103
39 Summary
112
Forced Dynamics of the RLC System
115
42 The Particular Solution
116
43 Using the Complex Exponential Function
117
44 Overdamped Forced Dynamics
119
45 Underdamped Forced Dynamics
122
46 Critically Damped Forced Dynamics
124
47 Transient and Steady States
126
48 The Concept of Reactance
131
49 The Concepts of Impedance Complex Impedance
137
410 Summary
142
The Analysis of Composite Waveforms
145
52 Basic Theory
148
SingleStep Waveform
151
Piecewise Waveform
157
55 Numerical Formulation
164
Cardiac Waveform
169
68 Composite PressureFlow Relations Under RLC in Parallel
213
69 Summary
219
Lumped Models
221
RC
222
R1R2+C
229
R1+LR2+C
235
R1+pbR2+C
241
76 InflowOutflow
249
77 Summary
252
Elements of UnlumpedModel Analysis
255
82 The Streamwise Space Dimension
256
83 Steady Flow along Tube Segments
258
84 Steady Flow Through a Bifurcation
265
85 Pulsatile Flow in a Rigid Tube
272
86 Pulsatile Flow in an Elastic Tube
279
87 Wave Reflections
287
88 Summary
297
Basic Unlumped Models
299
92 Steady Flow in Branching Tubes
300
93 Pulsatile Flow in Rigid Branching Tubes
307
94 Elastic Branching Tubes
313
95 Effective Impedance Admittance
317
96 Pulsatile Flow in Elastic Branching Tubes
329
97 Cardiac Pressure Wave in Elastic Branching Tubes
343
98 Summary
358
Dynamic Pathologies
361
102 Magic Norms?
362
103 Coronary Heart Disease Physical Exercise and the Conundrum of Coronary Flow Reserve
370
104 Wave Propagation Through a Coronary Bypass
378
105 Wave Propagation Through a Coronary Stent
381
106 Sudden Cardiac Death
384
107 Broken Heart Syndrome
387
108 Summary
388
References
391
Index
403
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 394 - RL Hemodynamics of collapsible vessels with tone: the vascular waterfall. J. Appl. Physiol.
Page 405 - ... Engineering, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, USA Earl W. Prohofsky, Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA Andrew Rubin, Department of Biophysics, Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia Michael Seibert, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado, USA David Thomas, Department of Biochemistry, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA Samuel 1.

About the author (2005)

The author, originally trained in fluid dynamics, has been teaching and working on the dynamics of blood flow in general and coronary blood flow in particular for the past thirty years and has produced a book that will appeal to physicians, physicists and engineers.

Bibliographic information