Kant and the Demands of Self-Consciousness

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 22, 2001 - Philosophy - 296 pages
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In Kant and the Demands of Self-Consciousness, Pierre Keller examines Kant's theory of self-consciousness and argues that it succeeds in explaining how both subjective and objective experience are possible. Previous interpretations of Kant's theory have held that he treats all self-consciousness as knowledge of objective states of affairs, and also that self-consciousness can be interpreted as knowledge of personal identity. By developing this striking new interpretation Keller is able to argue that transcendental self-consciousness underwrites a general theory of objectivity and subjectivity at the same time.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Introducing apperception
19
Concepts laws and the recognition of objects
45
Selfconsciousness and the demands of judgment in the BDeduction
65
Selfconsciousness and the unity of intuition completing the BDeduction
87
Timeconsciousness in the Analogies
113
Causal laws
141
Selfconsciousness and the pseudodiscipline of transcendental psychology
161
How independent is the self from its body?
182
The argument against idealism
196
Empirical realism and transcendental idealism
217
Conclusion
235
Notes
242
Bibliography
270
Index
282
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