Introduction to Computer Music

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, Feb 1, 2010 - Music - 396 pages
A must-have introduction that bridges the gap between music and computing

The rise in number of composer-programmers has given cause for an essential resource that addresses the gap between music and computing and looks at the many different software packages that deal with music technology. This up-to-date book fulfills that demand and deals with both the practical use of technology in music as well as the principles behind the discipline. Aimed at musicians exploring computers and technologists engaged with music, this unique guide merges the two worlds so that both musicians and computer scientists can benefit.

  • Defines computer music and offers a solid introduction to representing music on a computer
  • Examines computer music software, the musical instrument digital interface, virtual studios, file formats, and more
  • Shares recording tips and tricks as well as exercises at the end of each section to enhance your learning experience
  • Reviews sound analysis, processing, synthesis, networks, composition, and modeling

Assuming little to no prior experience in computer programming, this engaging book is an ideal starting point for discovering the beauty that can be created when technology and music unite.

 

 

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Contents

2Recording
44
3Analysis
75
Processing
119
5Synthesis
159
6Interaction
191
Networks
231
Composition
263
Modeling
315
Conclusions
341
References
347
Index
369
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Dr Nick Collins is a composer, performer and researcher in the field of computer music. He lectures at the University of Sussex, running the music informatics degree programmes and research group. Research interests include machine listening, interactive and generative music, audiovisual performance, sound synthesis and music psychology. He co-edited the Cambridge Companion to Electronic Music (Cambridge University Press), and is fond of the non sequitur.
He is an experienced pianist and computer music performer, and active in both instrumental and electronic music composition.

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