Magic Mineral to Killer Dust: Turner & Newall and the Asbestos Hazard

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Oxford University Press, Mar 16, 2000 - Business & Economics - 342 pages
Asbestos was once known as the 'magic mineral' because of its ability to withstand flames. Yet since the 1970s, it has become a notorious and feared 'killer dust' that is responsible for thousands of deaths and an epidemic that continues into the new millennium. This is the first comprehensive account of the UK asbestos health problem, which provides an in-depth look at the occupational health experience of one of the world's leading asbestos companies-British asbestos giant, Turner & Newall. Based on a vast company archive recently released in American litigation, 'Magic Mineral to Killer Dust' gives an unprecedented insight into all aspects of the asbestos hazard - dust control, workmen's compensation, government regulation, and the development of medical knowledge. In particular, it looks at the role of industrialists, doctors, factory inspectors, and trades unionists, highlighting the failures in regulation that allowed the commercial development of a material that was known to be lethal since at least 1900.
 

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Contents

1 A Physical Paradox
1
1931 to the 1940s
23
3 Medical Provision Diagnosis and Prescription
53
4 Compensation for Asbestos Workers
69
5 Death by Industrial Disease
88
1940s to the Early 1960s
120
7 Countervailing Forces
159
8 Lighting the Powder Trail
178
9 The Asbestos Bomb Explodes
209
10 Turner Newall on Trial
244
11 An Acceptable Level of Death
274
Damn You Turner Brothers
294
Bibliography
301
Index
313
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About the author (2000)

Geoffrey Tweedale is Reader in the Centre for Business History, Manchester Metropolitan University. From 1983 he worked as a Researcher and Teacher in the History of Business, Technology, and Medicine, and more recently has held the position of Research Fellow at both Manchester and Sheffield universities.

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