War in a Time of Peace: Bush, Clinton and the Generals

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Bloomsbury, 2003 - Intervention (International law) - 540 pages
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Sweeping in scope and impressive in its depth, 'War in a Time of Peace' provides fascinating portraits of the main players within the US government including Clinton, Bush, Reagan and Kissinger and a stunning view of what lies behind the empire over which George W. Bush now presides. Pulitzer Prize winner David Halberstam brilliantly evokes the internecine conflicts, the untrammelled egos, and the struggles for dominance among the key figures in the White House, the State department, and the military in the post-Soviet period. He shows how in the last ten years the Vietnam war has shaped American politics and policy makers and especially the decisions of men who served in the war, such as General Colin Powell and presidential advisors Richard Holbrooke and Anthony Lake as well as those who did not. It is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand America in the twenty-first century.

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User Review  - gmicksmith - LibraryThing

This work makes me nostalgic for the days when America existed and the country could choose to fight a war or no, it was strong, and projected itself as a force to improve the world. It all seems so ... Read full review

War in a time of peace: Bush, Clinton, and the generals

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Halberstam, the former Vietnam War correspondent and redoubtable historian (The Best and the Brightest), assesses the lasting influence of the Indochina war on U.S. foreign policy. Popular lore has ... Read full review

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About the author (2003)

David Halberstam was born on April 10, 1934 in New York City and later attended Harvard University. After graduating in 1955, Halberstam worked at a small daily newspaper until he attained a position at the Nashville Tennessean. Halberstam has written over 20 books including The Children, a written account of his coverage of the Civil Rights Movement; The Best and Brightest, which was a bestseller; and The Game and October, 1964, both detailing his fascination of sports. Halberstam also won a Pulitzer Prize for his reports on the Vietnam War while working for the New York Times. He was killed in a car crash on April 23, 2007 at the age of 73.

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