A Gazetteer of the Territories Under the Government of the East-India Company, and of the Natives States on the Continent of India

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W.H. Allen & Company, 1857 - India - 1014 pages
 

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Page 422 - Elizabeth under the name of the Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading to the East Indies.
Page 13 - To note the various countries, provinces, or territorial divisions, and to describe the physical characteristics of each, together with their statistical, social, and political circumstances.
Page 178 - The Governor-General in Council having exacted the reparation he deems sufficient, desires no further conquest in Burmah, and is willing to consent that hostilities should cease. But if the King of Ava shall fail to renew his former relations of friendship with the British Government, and if he shall recklessly seek to dispute its quiet possession of the Province it has now declared to be its own, the Governor-General in Council will again put forth the power he holds, and will visit with full retribution...
Page 329 - From the brow of this curious wall of snow, and immediately above the outlet of the stream, large and hoary icicles depend...
Page 310 - ... the top by a broad bandage of the same shape; above this, but divided from it by a circular astragal and two polygonic fillets, rises a short round fluted shaft, forming about a fourth of the column and diminishing with a curve towards the top, where a circular cincture of beads binds round it a fillet composed of an ornament resembling leaves, or rather cusps, the lower extremity of which appears below the cincture, while the superior extremity rises above, projecting and terminating gracefully...
Page 310 - ... other ranges running at right angles in the opposite direction ; they are strong and massy, of an order remarkably well adapted to their situation and the purpose which they are to serve, and have an appearance of very considerable elegance. They are not all of the same form, but differ both in size and ornaments, though this difference also does not at first strike the eye.
Page 178 - Burmese forces have been dispersed wherever they have been met ; and the Province of PEGU is now in the occupation of British troops. The just and moderate demands of the Government of India have been rejected by the King; the ample opportunity that has been afforded him for repairing the injury that was done has been disregarded ; and the timely submission which alone could have been effectual to prevent the dismemberment of his kingdom, is still withheld.
Page 166 - Burman forces have been dispersed, wherever they have been met ; and the province of Pegu is now in the occupation of British troops. "The just and moderate demands of the Government of India have been rejected by the king. The ample opportunity that has been afforded him for repairing the injury that was done has been disregarded ; and the timely submission, which alone could have been effectual to prevent the dismemberment of his kingdom, is still withheld.
Page 178 - Council hereby calls on the inhabitants of Pegu to submit themselves to the authority, and to confide securely in the protection of the British government, whose power they have seen to be irresistible, and whose rule is marked by justice and beneficence. The...
Page 166 - The Court of Ava having refused to make amends for the injuries and insults which British subjects had suffered at the hands of its servants, the Governor-General of India in Council resolved to exact reparation by force of arms. " The forts and cities upon the coast were forthwith attacked and captured ; the...

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