The Complete American and Canadian Sportsman's Encyclopedia of Valuable Instruction

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American and Canadian sportman's assn., 1905 - Camping - 526 pages
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Page 306 - A man's dog stands by him in prosperity and in poverty, in health and in sickness. He will sleep on the cold ground, where the wintry winds blow and the snow drives fiercely, if only he may be near his master's side. He will kiss the hand that has no food to offer; he will lick the wounds and sores that come in encounter with the roughness of the world. He guards the sleep of his pauper master as if he were a prince. When all other friends desert he remains. When rich; take wings and reputation falls...
Page 306 - If fortune drives the master forth an outcast in the world, friendless and homeless, the faithful dog asks no higher privilege than that of accompanying him, to guard against danger, to fight against his enemies. "And when the last scene of all comes, and death takes the master in its embrace and his body is laid away in the cold ground, no matter if all other friends pursue their way, there by the graveside will the noble dog be found, his head between his paws, his eyes sad but open in alert watchfulness,...
Page 306 - Gentlemen of the Jury — The best friend a man has in the world may turn against him and become his enemy. His son or daughter that he has reared with loving care may prove ungrateful. Those who are nearest and dearest to us, those whom we trust with our happiness and our good name, may become traitors to their faith. The money that a man has, he may lose. It flies away from him, perhaps when he needs it most. A man's reputation may be sacrificed in a moment of ill-considered action.
Page 306 - The one absolutely unselfish friend that man can have in this selfish world, the one that never deserts him, the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous is his dog.
Page 306 - Gentlemen of the jury, the best friend a man has in this world may turn against him and become his enemy. His son or daughter whom he has reared with loving care may prove ungrateful. Those who are nearest and dearest to us— those whom we trust with our happiness and our good name— may become traitors to their faith. The money that a man has he may lose. It flies away from him. perhaps when he needs it most.
Page 306 - A man's reputation may be sacrificed in a moment of ill-considered action. The people who are prone to fall on their knees to do us honor when success is with...
Page 364 - Wash the skin clean, as above, and have saleratus, 2 ozs., dissolved in hot rain water sufficient to well saturate the skin; then: Take alum, 4 ozs.; salt, 8 ozs., and dissolve also in hot rain water; when sufficiently cool to allow the handling of It without scalding, put in the skin for 12 hours; then wring out the water and hang up for 12 hours more to dry. Repeat this last soaking and drying from 2 to 4 times, according to the desired softness of the skin when finished. Lastly. — Finish by...
Page 113 - Poisons. In all cases of poisoning there should be no avoidable delay in summoning a physician. The most Important thing is that the stomach should be emptied at once. If the patient is able to swallow this may be accomplished by emetics, such as mustard and water, a teaspoonful of mustard to a glass of water, salt and water, powdered ipecac and copious draughts of luke warm water. Vomiting may also be induced by tickling the back of the throat with a feather. When the patient begins to vomit, care...
Page 364 - Finish by pulling, working, etc. and finally by rubbiug with piece of pumice-stone and fine sand-paper. This works admirably on sheep skins as well as on fur-skins, dog, cat or wolf-skins also, making a durable leather well adapted to washing. Above recipes are reliable if strictly followed; if skins are however, well cleaned of meats and part of the fat well salted, rolled up and tied, they had best be shipped us at
Page 369 - Add three or four quarts of salt for a moose, and a pint and a half for deer, well worked in. Cover the whole with the sides and corners of the hide to keep out flies, and let it remain in this condition about two hours. Drive four forked stakes into the ground so as to form a square of about eight or ten feet, leaving the forks four feet high. Lav two poles across one way in these forks, and fill the whole space the other way with poles laid on the first two, about two inches apart. The strips of...

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