Old Greek Stories: Third Reader Grade

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American Book Company, 1895 - Mythology, Greek - 208 pages
 

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User Review  - Carole8 - LibraryThing

I mistakenly bought this book believing that it was written by the American author of the same name. I persevered with it but didn't really enjoy it. Read full review

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Page 40 - There was a young girl in Greece whose name was Arachne. Her face was pale but fair, and her eyes were big and blue, and her hair was long and like gold. All that she cared to do from morn till noon was to sit in the sun and spin ; and all that she cared to do from noon till night was to sit in the shade and weave. And oh, how fine and fair were the things which she wove in her loom ! Flax, wool, silk — she worked with them all; and when they came from her hands, the cloth which she had made of...
Page 43 - Athena. Arachne's cheeks grew pale, but she said: " Yes. I can weave as well as you." " Then let me tell you what we will do," said Athena. " Three days from now we will both weave; you on your loom, and I on mine. We will ask all the world to come and see us; and great Jupiter, who sits in the clouds, shall be the judge. And if your work is best, then I will weave no more so long as the world shall last; but if my work is best, then you shall never use loom or spindle or distaff again. Do you agree...
Page 75 - Once there lived in a cottage a very old man and woman and they had two children, a boy and a girl. The boy's name was Mikko and the girl's name was Liisa.
Page 45 - ... Arachne with the tip of the spear which she sometimes carried ; and the maiden was changed at once into a nimble spider, which ran into a shady place in the grass and began merrily to spin and weave a beautiful web. I have heard it said that all the spiders which have been in the world since then are the children of Arachne; but I doubt whether this be true. Yet, for aught I know, Arachne still lives and spins and weaves; and the very next spider that you see may be she herself.
Page 45 - And yet, since you will never be happy unless you can spin and weave, I will give you a new form so that you can carry on your work with neither spindle nor loom." Then she touched Arachne with the tip of the spear which she sometimes carried; and the maiden was changed at once into a nimble spider, which ran into a shady place in the grass and began merrily to spin and weave a beautiful web. I have heard it said that all the spiders which have been in the world since then are children of Arachne...
Page 42 - Who taught you to spin and weave so well ? " some one asked. " No one taught me," she said. " I learned how to do it as I sat in the sun and the shade; but no one showed me." " But it may be that Athena, the queen of the air, taught you, and you .did not know it.
Page 43 - It is well," said Athena. Arid she was gone. II. THE WOOF. When the time came for the contest in weaving, all the world was there to see it, and great Jupiter sat among the clouds and looked on. Arachne had set up her loom in the shade of a mulberry tree, where butterflies were flitting and grasshoppers chirping all through the livelong day. But Athena had set up her loom in the sky, where the breezes were blowing and the summer sun was shining; for she was the queen of the air. Then Arachne took...
Page 45 - ... dwarfs, and of the mighty beings who dwell in the clouds with Jupiter. And those who looked upon it were so filled with wonder and delight, that they forgot all about the beautiful web which Arachne had woven. And Arachne herself was ashamed and afraid when she saw it; and she hid her face in her hands and wept.
Page 3 - I have here attempted to tell a few stories of Jupiter and his mighty company and of some of the old Greek heroes, simply as stories, nothing more. I have carefully avoided every suggestion of interpretation. Attempts at • analysis and explanation will always prove fatal to a child's appreciation and enjoyment of such stories. To...
Page 190 - So he flew up higher and higher, but his father who was in front did not see him. Pretty soon, however, the heat of the sun began to melt the wax with which the boy's wings were fastened. He felt himself sinking through the air; the wings had become loosened from his shoulders.

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