The Red House Mystery

Front Cover
General Books LLC, 2010 - Fiction - 120 pages
Excerpt: ..."Coming to help us?" "You don't really want us," said Antony, smiling back at him. "You can come if you like." Antony gave a little shudder. "You can tell me afterwards what you find," he said. "By the way," he added, "I hope the landlord at 'the George' gave me a good character?" The Inspector looked at him quickly. "Now how on earth do you know anything about that?" Antony bowed to him gravely. "Because I guessed that you were a very efficient member of the Force." The inspector laughed. "Well, you came out all right, Mr. Gillingham. You got a clean bill. But I had to make certain about you. "Of course you did. Well, I wish you luck. But I don't think you'll find much at the pond. It's rather out of the way, isn't it, for anybody running away?" "That's just what I told Mr. Cayley, when he called my attention to the pond. However, we shan't do any harm by looking. It's the unexpected that's the most likely in this sort of case." "You're quite right, Inspector. Well, we mustn't keep you. Good afternoon," and Antony smiled pleasantly at him. "Good afternoon, sir." "Good afternoon," said Bill. Antony stood looking after the Inspector as he strode off, silent for so long that Bill shook him by the arm at last, and asked him rather crossly what was the matter. Antony shook his head slowly from side to side. "I don't know; really I don't know. It's too devilish what I keep thinking. He can't be as cold-blooded as that." "Who?" Without answering, Antony led the way back to the garden-seat on which they had been sitting. He sat there with his head in his hands. "Oh, I hope they find something," he murmured. "Oh, I hope they do." "In the pond?" "Yes." "But what?" "Anything, Bill; anything." Bill was annoyed. "I say, Tony, this won't do. You really mustn't be so damn mysterious. What's happened to you suddenly?" Antony looked up at him in surprise. "Didn't you hear what he said?" "What, particularly?" "That it was Cayley's idea to drag the pond." "Oh! Oh, I...

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Pauntley - LibraryThing

Too small a cast of characters for a Whodunnit - it’s a Whydiddydoit, resolved in the end by the murderer’s epistolary confession. Country house mystery. Period charm and engaging prose with a pair of jolly pipe smoking chaps, guests of the murdered host, playing at Holmes and Watson. Read full review

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User Review  - rainpebble - LibraryThing

The Red House Mystery by A.A. Milne; (4*); (44) A typical 'locked room mystery', this novel features characters who may not be all they seem to be or may perhaps may be more than they seem to be. Each ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

A prolific writer, A. A. Milne published 35 plays, 6 novels, 3 books of verse, 3 collections of short stories, and several works of nonfiction, including sketches for Punch magazine, of which he was the assistant editor. Nevertheless, his fame rests on four books for children: two of whimsical stories about the stuffed animals in his son's bedroom (Winnie-the-Pooh and The House at Pooh Corner) and two of verse (When We Were Very Young and Now We Are Six). All are considered classics and have been included among the Children's Literature Association's Touchstone books as the best in children's literature, on the Lewis Carroll Shelf list, and on the Choice magazine list of books for the academic library. He also wrote Toad of Toad Hall, a play based on Grahame's The Wind in the Willows, and Once upon a Time: A Fairy Tale for Grown-ups, both of which are sometimes included in volumes with the four classic works. Milne had a son, Christopher Robin, who served as the model for the little boy in his children's books.

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