Trees, truffles, and beasts: how forests function

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Rutgers University Press, Feb 1, 2008 - Nature - 280 pages
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In Trees, Truffles, and Beasts, Chris Maser, Andrew W. Claridge, and James M. Trappe make a compelling case that we must first understand the complexity and interdependency of species and habitats from the microscopic level to the gigantic. Comparing forests in the Pacific Northwestern United States and Southeastern mainland of Australia, the authors show how easily observable species -- trees and mammals -- are part of a complicated infrastructure that includes fungi, lichens, and organisms invisible to the naked eye, such as microbes. -- from publisher description

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People and Forests Are Inseparable
The Unseen Forest

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About the author (2008)

Chris Maser Maser has spent over 25 years as a research scientist in natural history and ecology in forest, shrub steppe, sub-arctic, desert, coastal, and agricultural settings. He is an independent author as well as an international lecturer, facilitator in resolving environmental conflicts, vision statements, and sustainable community development. He is also an international consultant in forest ecology and sustainable forestry practices and has written over 260 publications, including authoring or co-authoring fifteen books, including: Planning for Sustainable Development (2000); Forest Certification in Sustainable Development: Healing the Landscape (2000); and The World is in My Garden: A Journey of Consciousness (2001).

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